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Chez le médecin

I've lived in France long enough to know what a soutien-gorge is, but I have always believed that that was an exceptional meaning and that la gorge normally means the throat.

However, I recently found a description of a woman with une gorge énorme qui saillit sous sa robe.  Obviously this doesn't refer to her throat, but it was written in the 1870s (Maupassant), so the meaning may have changed.  My dictionary mentions both meanings but doesn't really clarify anything.

This is not a trivial question; I've been talking to people learning French – some of whom are female – about things you might need to say to a doctor, and I've told them among other things that j'ai mal à la gorge simply means that you have a sore throat, just as you might say j'ai mal à l'épaule or j'ai mal au genou.  Was this safe advice?

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Re: Chez le médecin

Yes. If the problem was the chest, you would say poitrine. But if a breast, le sein
Too thick for a PhD!
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Re: Chez le médecin

Thanks.  I'm reassured.

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Re: Chez le médecin

 allanb wrote:

However, I recently found a description of a woman with une gorge énorme qui saillit sous sa robe.  Obviously this doesn't refer to her throat, but it was written in the 1870s (Maupassant), so the meaning may have changed.  My dictionary mentions both meanings but doesn't really clarify anything.

Gorge also means gorge in the English sense (vallée défilé) so it was a very good description for the cleavage surging from under the robe Big Smile [:D]


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Re: Chez le médecin

As long as it wasn't la gorge profonde  Devil [6]

Seriously I think that gorge in the Maupassant would best be translated as 'cleavage'

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: Chez le médecin

 NormanH wrote:
As long as it wasn't la gorge profonde  Devil [6]

Seriously I think that gorge in the Maupassant would best be translated as 'cleavage'

In this Maupassant bit, gorge means breasts as the breasts are showing up through the fabric.  (cleavage would be translated as decolette).

 


Les voyages forment la jeunesse
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Re: Chez le médecin

How useful that all was - you learn something new everyday, but not always quite a useful as that!!  Thanks!

Judith
ex W1, via 47 and 11 and now [just] in 34, equidistant from Carcassonne, Narbonne and Béziers, where I hope we'll finally stay!!

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Re: Chez le médecin

Your eyes are obviously not popping out of your head Judith.
Does this mean the second eye operation has been done?

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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