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another of those mystifying French phrases

I'm looking to see if we could possibly squeeze another piano into one of our rooms downstairs.

Searching on line, I have found a beauty, though the price makes me suck in my breath a bit.  The advert says that the piano has been used "comme piano d'appoint".

Now, what on earth can that mean?  I suppose being "d'appoint" is a good thing or the advertiser wouldn't have emphasised that?


N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: another of those mystifying French phrases

I guess it's been used as a backup or a spare. Must be either a very musical or well of person to have a spare piano for - for what? Guests? in case the other one breaks down? Someone pops round for a duet?

Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
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Re: another of those mystifying French phrases

Yes, that makes sense as the seller is a professional musician.

Hmmm.....anyone wants to buy my car "d'appoint"?


N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: another of those mystifying French phrases

You mean the 500cc pitt putt? Or the little Beamer?
Too thick for a PhD!
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Re: another of those mystifying French phrases

Sorry, duplication.
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Re: another of those mystifying French phrases

Betty is right. I have often seen d'appoint with chauffage, implying a plug in electric fire, or a paraffin stove rather than built -in heating system.

I think for a piano I would translate it as a "practise piano" as opposed to one good enough to give a recital on.

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: another of those mystifying French phrases

I get the impression that the piano being "d'appoint" is to emphasise that it is little used.

I went back to re-read the advert, it says indeed that it is "très peu utilisé, that the vendeur is from a conservatoire, that the piano has been chosen for its its good tone and with much care.

As for the question Betty asks about why a "spare" piano, perhaps I should explain that OH and I have been known to argue about whose turn it is to play (yes exactly like 2 kids) and, in the past, I have always said that should we come to divorce, I wanted the cats (we had 2 now alas long since gone to catty heaven) and the piano!

Also, I believe it was Horowitz who had a piano on each flour of his 4-storey house.  So you see, some people do have justification for having more than one piano!

 


N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: another of those mystifying French phrases

For me d'appoint means temporary or standby, something used occasionally to either supplement something or temporarily replace it, examples being un lit or canapé d'appoint, a guest bed or zed bed, or chauffage d'appoint being a portable gas or fan heater.

A piano d'appoint though? I suppose if it was small enough he could take it to recitals or repetitions.


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