Swimming Pools in France

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The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

I know this s a long time after the law came in, but it puzzles me, especially as not even my marie knows the answers.

I am about to change my alarm, after my was taken (!!!). The new one is up to the standard, and has the certificates.

Ours is a private house, in the middle of no where. We don't rent out, and rarely have guests. We're also not there (work) for longish periods.

Now, there is a fence, between the house and the pool, but ultimately if the alarm is set off, and we're working, no one is going to hear the alarm. The fence is part of the garden fencing, and to fence the pool to "standard" would costs as much as the house did.

My questions are, as I have met the criteria  (the alarm), do I need the fence, (I know it's belt and braces, but it is a garden fence). IF, and it's a very big if, considering our location, someone got to the pool while we are working/away, they would be trespassing, and if they got into the pool, it's doubtful anyone could hear the alarm anyway.

I want to remove the fence, but it's not critical!!

"Some swine has taken the cork to my lunch"
W C Fields
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Re: The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

 f1steveuk wrote:

My questions are, as I have met the criteria  (the alarm), do I need the fence ?
I want to remove the fence, but it's not critical!!

Just a thought but friends of ours have a holiday home abutting the Golfe de Morbihan. When they bought the house the pool was already in place with no security at all so, to comply with the law, they fitted a locked heavyweight cover, which is unrolled daily when the pool is in use. The pool is in front of the house, there is neither fence nor alarm and you can see the pool from the gulf road, along which the world and his wife and the gendarmes pass almost daily.

Sue

Computing - it's another world
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Re: The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

Exactly my point, if you read the law, as written you need EITHER a fence, an alarm OR a cover, none of whichare relly any good if I am not there!!

"Some swine has taken the cork to my lunch"
W C Fields
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Re: The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

 f1steveuk wrote:
... OR a cover, none of whichare relly any good if I am not there!!

Well as the law was introduced to stop children from drowning in an unattended pool I would have thought a heavy locked cover would have stopped a child from doing exactly that. They could climb a fence or ignore an alarm but, even if you were not there, they would be hard pushed to take a locked cover off.

Edit : What really gets me is all the houses, with swimming pools, I see for sale on 'maison à vendre' on M6 which have no fence, no alarm and defintely no lockable cover evident. In fact I cannot remember seeing even one private property for sale that had any security protection for the pool.

Sue

Computing - it's another world
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Re: The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

I understand what you're saying, it's just missing my point, and the questions I asked. Yes, a heavy cover would do it, if it were possible, whicjh it isn't.

The questions I asked were is it either, or, and can I lose the fence?

"Some swine has taken the cork to my lunch"
W C Fields
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Re: The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

Question: How many on here have had a spot inspection of their pool to ascertain whether or not it meets the security/safety requirements?

I suggest that the only possible time that the arrangements will ever be examined is after someone has drowned in it.

Would you be happy to argue that the carpy alarm that was installed absolves you of any responsibility?





On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H. L. Mencken 1880 - 1956

Some may not like his views, but what a prediction!
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Re: The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

<BLOCKQUOTE><table width="85%"><tr><td class="txt4"><img src="/forums/completefrance/cs/Themes/default/images/icon-quote.gif">&nbsp;<strong>f1steveuk wrote:</strong></td></tr><tr><td class="quoteTable"><table width="100%"><tr><td width="100%" valign="top" class="txt4"> The fence is part of the garden fencing, and to fence the pool to "standard" would costs as much as the house did.<br><br></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></BLOCKQUOTE>

A little exaggeration there OP. Rough estimate would be €40 per meter + gate. Going by worldofpools.com

I do know what your saying though. Our neighbour has no fence alarm or cover for his pool just shrugs when mentioned.
All off my immigrant friends/neighbours who have pools comply with their rules.

Honestly to answer your Q's No you are not complying with an alarm and not being there, but you know that. Regarding them being charged with trespassing possibly Yes if they lived if they died NO. You would be €40,000 poorer.
Would I take a similar risk No. We have a glass fence and gate but if my budget was stretched, I would opt for the one in the link I provided.

Edit - In the 14 yrs we have had our pool not once have we had a visit re compliance.
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Re: The Pool Laws and Their Grey Areas

You see, there are the  grey areas. If I went shopping for the morning, and someone wondereed in and fell in, I, nor none of my neighbours would hear the alarm, let alone respond. But I have met the criteria. The fact I may go on holiday, or go away to work is, ultimately no different. No one can stay in their house 24/7, just in case, just because they have a pool.

I know of French families who work in Paris, and have homes near us with pools, and each has attempted to meet the criteria. One has a cover, one has a fence, one has just an alarm, and another an alarm and fence. The Marie told them, they have met the criteria. It boils down to what you can do, and what is sensible, because ultimately the only 100% cast iron way to prevent accidents would be to employ a 24/7, 52 weeks of the year pool guard, and sit him in a deckchair just watching.

Trust me, I understand why the law exists, and I applaud it, it's just, like a lot of laws (breathalysers etc) half arsed, and full of grey areas, until, as has been pointed out, it does go wrong, then I know the French would make the law apply to the situation.


The law does say "Either", "or", and obviously all would be better, but we can only read the law as written.

I was told there is a codicile to the law regarding age. It is unlikely a five year old would wonder on to my property alone, so should someone "help themselves" and it goes wrong, it is assumed (by the French, not me), that they were  old enough to know what they were doing and therefore understood the risks. I have yet to see this in print mind you!


As for trusting a "crappy" alarm. That is what the law is suggesting, that we trust an alarm, or a cover, or a fence. The alarm I have is above the required standard, and far from crappy, and I get  the feeling if you had all three, it still wouldn't be enough, none of the methods is infallable to someone determined to get in, like house alarms, but you have to look at the age group the methods are aimed at, which I  would venture would be 12/13 and below.

No, I am not happy about leaving the pool and worry endlessly when we aren't at home, either just going shopping for the morning, or having to be away working, and if I could have all three prevention methods, I would, but sometimes it simply isn't possible, for many reasons and you can only do as much as you can, and as I say, by the way the law is written, and has been passed, I am covered




"Some swine has taken the cork to my lunch"
W C Fields
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