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help translating a ? colloquialism

This is from a french cartoon series (Pico Bogue).

 I can find the individual words but can't work out the overall sense.
Pico is a precocious little boy who asks all members of his family "who am I?"
After others give him kind replies his father says
"Quelqu'un qui cassera la baraque après s'être flanqué un bon coup de pied au cul!"
https://www.amazon.fr/Pico-Bogue-9-Carnet-bord/dp/2205075640

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Re: help translating a ? colloquialism

I'm having trouble with the être flanquer

 

Se flanquer dedans means to land oneself in it.

 

Se flanquer en l'air means to top oneself.

 

So my translation is someone who will smash up their gaff after giving themselves (or being given) a good kick up the ar5e.

 

Maybe its someone that only gets their finger out after having a fire lit under them?


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Re: help translating a ? colloquialism

After getting a good kick up the ar5e....
a bit like a 'box around th ears'
après s'être   indicates a reflexive verb which is often translated as a passive in English...

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: help translating a ? colloquialism

Casser la baraque seems to mean to play a blinder, to achieve great success
So I would say
Someone who could achieve great things, given a hard enough kick up the backside

ie, after rereading the thread properly, exactly what Chancer said :-)
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Re: help translating a ? colloquialism

Thanks - yes that fits.
I find french cartoon series good for learning to understand the language. Because you've got the pictures to help.

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Re: help translating a ? colloquialism

 NormanH wrote:
After getting a good kick up the ar5e....
a bit like a 'box around th ears'
après s'être   indicates a reflexive verb which is often translated as a passive in English...

 

Thats why learning French is so hard for me as I have no notion of grammar or grammatical terms thanks to my 70's progressive (non) education.

 

But I am trying to learn, in the example above do you mean the reflexive verb being "to kick oneself " and the passive being "to be kicked" ?


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Re: help translating a ? colloquialism

And finally as its cassera and not casserait I propose that the father was saying he will achieve great things rather than would.

 

Sounds like a commitment to kick ar5e!


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Re: help translating a ? colloquialism

 Chancer wrote:

 NormanH wrote:
After getting a good kick up the ar5e....
a bit like a 'box around th ears'
après s'être   indicates a reflexive verb which is often translated as a passive in English...

 

Thats why learning French is so hard for me as I have no notion of grammar or grammatical terms thanks to my 70's progressive (non) education.

 

But I am trying to learn, in the example above do you mean the reflexive verb being "to kick oneself " and the passive being "to be kicked" ?



Yes exactly.  Reflexive (a bit like reflection) because there is the idea of oneself in the action
Some verbs are more or less always used like this
Je m'assois (some people say je m'assieds) 'I sit myself down'
Others can be used either directly or reflexively
For example "I said to  myself "as opposed to 'I said '

And these reflexive verbs and other verbs used in a reflexive way take être in the passé composé, even when they take avoir otherwise:

So 'I said'  J'ai dit  but I said to myself  je me suis dit

That of course introduces the further complication that as être is being used the ending has to agree with the subject ...so  elle s'est couchée (because she laid herself down
BUT Woot! [:-))]
in the case of je me suis dit  I said something to myself...I didnt 'say myself
so elle se dit (not dite)

elle se dit la vérité because what she told(to)herself was the truth

http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pronominalverbs_4.htm


The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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