French Language

Topic has 8 replies.
Print Search Sort Posts:

encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

I think I usually get the first one right:
encore is usually "again".
toujours, always or still ie "she's still working".
Not sure about the next one - I asked in the garden centre, "avez vous de plus de cette plante?" And she replied "il y a beaucoup d'avantage la bas".
Any further advice?

   Report   Reply Quote

Re: encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

I would say that d'avantage means something like 'a lot more' or 'further"
'savoir d'avantage' is used when you want further information for example, or travailler d'avantage means 'to work a lot more'

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

QUOTE patf
encore is usually "again".
toujours, always or still ie "she's still working".
Not sure about the next one - I asked in the garden centre, "avez vous de plus de cette plante?" And she replied "il y a beaucoup d'avantage la bas".
END QUOTE

Actually, I think in the example you gave, Pat, of "She is still working", you might hear "toujours" OR "encore".
"Elle travaille encore"
"Elle travaille toujours"
I stand to be corrected, but I think either of them can mean both "She is still at work" (i.e. working late), or "She is still working" (i.e. hasn't retired/given up work yet).

Plus is a tricky one, because it can mean "more" and "no more"!
"Avez-vous d'avantage de plantes comme celles-ci?" "Non, il y'en a plus". (Of course, there should be a "ne" between "il" and "y", but in conversation it would often be dropped.




   Report   Reply Quote

Re: encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

I learned the difference between de plus and plus de to my cost very early on, I asked for another beer with my meal and the waitress took my glass away Sad [:(]

 

Pas encore can mean (correct me if I am wrong) net yet (started/done) or no more (no more please/I dont want any more)

 

D'avantage I understand the sense in which it is said but am not confident enough to use it except for certain instances where I regularly hear it, some-one ripping the ar5e out of something or someone, tirer d'avantage.


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

I had it from a French walking friend recently that toujours, like encore, can mean still as in c'est toujours disponible?

As Chance has said encore as in pas encore means not yet.

To introduce a new slant on this, I think toujours aussi means still as well......sigh....

N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

Or...

Oh non....pas encore ! - Oh no.... not again ! (As the art mistress said to the gardener....).

@+

Andrew

   Report   Reply Quote

Re: encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

Plus, yes I fell foul of that in my early days and avoid it as much as possible.

   Report   Reply Quote

Re: encore and toujours - plus and d'avantage

Thanks to all - oh dear, I'll never get the hang of this language. So many shades of meaning - (as in ours.)
But just hoping they know what I mean. There must be a limit to the times you can get away with "Desolée - je suis anglaise!" and they reply "Je sais".

   Report   Reply Quote

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most Read

Enter our competitions

Win books, DVDs, travel and even holidays in France in our great competitions! Take a look at our latest competitions…

Enter now

Join us on social media

France magazine
Living France magazine
French Property News magazine