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Tabouleh

Tabouleh: Like so many things  I cook that I learned to do in France, I was given the recipe verbally, and have no idea if any are 'true' recipes, or just local adaptations.

This is a dish that my son and I can snack on, we just love it.


Out of curiosity I have looked at some recipes and BBC food for example says to use bulgar wheat, which I am not so keen on, and I always use the same semoule that I use then making a couscous and would not dream of using that.

Although to confuse things in England they call 'semoule', cous cous???? and I find that weird, why not call it semolina, beause that is surely what it is????



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Re: Tabouleh

Semolina is delicious but has a bad reputation thanks to school meals, I suspect, so a fancy name is used.
Ticking over, just about.
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Re: Tabouleh

 Semolina is delicious as is semoule for savoury foods.

I never got why some school food was so badly thought of. There was little that I didn't like.

The worst and only thing I can think of was the cheap, grisly fatty beef cubes, which I didn't like, but the rest was lovely.

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Re: Tabouleh

Couscous is a dish made from semolina (semoule) and water, the basis of taboulé. The word semolina is also given to the sweet pudding made from the grains. The semoule that I buy in France says couscous on the packet.
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Re: Tabouleh

I used to make couscous from the Carrefour brand, medium, when we were in France. It was so easy - a measure of couscous, same measure of boiling water or stock, fork up and that was it. I added other things later.
But the couscous , and bulgar wheat that you get here (Tesco) seems different. I have to microwave it to get rid of the extra water they say in the recipe.
I still use it for a salad in the summer. After 'cooking' and cooling I add a tiny amount of salt, lemon juice and walnut oil, and parsley and mint from the back garden. A few raisins and chopped cashews. And chopped dried apricots.
We have it with cold meat or chicken. But back to basic casseroles now, less work.

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Re: Tabouleh

 idun wrote:
...........................
I never got why some school food was so badly thought of. There was little that I didn't like. ......

You obviously didn't have anything like the mutton stew served at my primary school.

They were already cooking it when we arrived in the morning, together with the boiled cabbage, and spuds, which they may well have been started the day before.

I'll never forget the large cubes of yellowish fat, with a sliver of meat concealed within them, which quivered like jelly when touched with a forkIck! [+o(]

On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H. L. Mencken 1880 - 1956

Some may not like his views, but what a prediction!
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Re: Tabouleh

Bof, that’s nothing; we had to go out the night before and scrape up the road kill so the cooks who were on loan from the local prison could boil it all night to make our stew!😢😤🤪
Ticking over, just about.
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Re: Tabouleh

It is a very long time since I have bought semoule in France, but seem to remember it saying semoule pour couscous, like I would see 'pudding rice' on short grain rice in the UK.

When I first got back really did ask for semolina, and then when they would show me the stuff for puddings, I would say for cous cous and that is all that was on the packet here.

I always fluff my semoule up, whether for the full dish 'couscous' or for tabouleh. I work it and always have, whether I use either my couscousier or a micro wave, I cook it a little and then use two forks, and keep lifting and turning it.



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