Earning a Living

Topic has 23 replies.
Print Search Sort Posts:

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

Hi I am so sorry but tough upper lip and all of that. See it through.

I get gently chided on being over here and being English! Here a comment and for nothing whatsoever but to shut up these guys and that is I am not English. They then go all over the world to try to find out where I come from. Sometimes they get it right mostly not and I am not from Tibet. I then chide them on their knowledge of the world and they walk away.

At this stage I say to them (and with Cooperlola I do not think this way) in Londres we have over 300000 French people well in excess of our being in France. Why do they go there? Then I stick it into them but gently.
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

A young Nepalese guy of my acquaintance, who was studying in France (Nantes and Paris), was telling me how much racism he encountered there - people saying what was a black man doing on the course, etc.   Reading the OP, it sounds horribly similar.

He has now married a French girl, and moved to the far-flung, more ethnic-friendly departement of La Reunion.


It's a good point made earlier, though, about what the attitudes by job-seekers in the UK would be on similar courses towards people from, say, Eastern Europe.  (Though one would hope that any antipathy would not be instigated by the *teacher*.)

Angela

   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

Oh, I cannot express how your comments have made me feel better.  Stupid I know, but for the last couple of days, I have really been 'off' France, and yet I know they aren't all like this.  I have some really nice, and supportive, French friends here.  I think it's just that I also have a couple of young friends who have have mixed parentage (Madagascan/French) and even with lots of good academics they have experienced all sort of horridness with finding work.  I then wonder for my poor kid, who's ten with an English mum and Canadian dad, but I realise that already, he is far tougher than lots of his friends, and just says he ignores the nastiness.  Damn it, he was born here, why should he be seen as different. 

I have an English girlfriend here, who is married to a French man, and she refuses to speak a word of French here, as she says she feels so got at (speaks it at home with her husband, and kids but not 'au public' so to speak - she did speak for five years and then just decided she'd had enough).  I don't think this is quite the way to go, although I can understand her feelings.  In a couple of days I shall be in chieftan tank mode and plough through their objections with the nicest of smiles, whilst deftly countering any asides with my evidently dreadful English accented French!  This is a battle I am going to win!  I really feel this to be my own personal Waterloo.  If I don't find work at something, I shall for ever feel I've failed, and that can't happen.


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

Well done Millie, keep at it!

As others have said there are people all over that feel threatened by 'strangers' taking jobs etc.  I worked  in France for a lovely french employer who welcomed Brits because of their work ethic, now as Brits complain over here about Polish etc taking low wages, the French used to have a go at me for being very flexible with my employer. 

I used to work when she needed me and not when she didn't, I took holidays when it was quiet all for the good of this very tiny business, the people that made these comments were supposed friends of my boss and they could not understand why I would work this way, didnt get the fact that if she failed then we had no job and so supporting/workiung for a business can mean putting them first but ultimatley we all gain!  The french idea about relationships with employers is at odds with my own and many others who've worked in fledging businesses.

So you've encountered some people who have fears that you could do a better job, nothing more, go out and show them!!


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

A refreshing thread (although painful for the OP) which shows the Xenephobia endemic in France.
Those who speak glibly of being 'integrated' have clearly never tried to compete for a job here.
As long as you are the fat wallet who pays over the odds for  houses and can afford expensive restaurants we are tolerated.
But once we start to threaten by applying for jobs.....
Imagine how much worse it is for non-Europeans.



The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

 NormanH wrote:
As long as you are the fat wallet who pays over the odds for  houses and can afford expensive restaurants we are tolerated.

I very quickly went from the above to being treated like someone dark skinned once people realised that I didnt have a fat wallet, wasnt a pigeon and had beat many locals to snapping up my place from the liquidator at a bargain price, some had been waiting many years.

It is the last that seems to engender the most bitterness towards me albeit expressed in racist terms.


   Report   Reply Quote
Beer [B]

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

I'd just like to point out that it is not always like that. I have been treated extremely well by the Pole Emploi, as has been my husband when he used them. I found work practically straight away and the Pole Emploi told me how to apply for a back to work travel grant as I had taken a job so far away - all of 35km!
My husband has had nothing but help from the Pole Emploi and the Chambre de Metiers and is now firmly established running his own business.
I have also been very sucessful in acquiring jobs, once a speculative letter, one I knocked on the door and asked for (and got) and my current job I applied for, from a newspaper advert.
However, what all my jobs have had in common, is that I have taken a much lower level of job than I would have if I was in an English speaking country. My spoken French is fairly fluent but my written French is poor and that is what is holding me back, not xenophobic attitudes. When you can complete on an equal footing with the local people, in every way and still not get a job, then I think you can imply that they are treating you differently due to your nationality. I don't live in a major tourist centre either, I live in Burgundy which has one of the highest levels of unemployment, although to be fair, it doesn't have high levels of foreigners either.
Millie, if you speak French, have the right attitudes and are willing to do anything - and I mean anything, you will find a job. Then once you start, the only way is up.
www.burgundymadeeasy.com
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

 Ladoix wrote:
I'd just like to point out that it is not always like that. I have been treated extremely well by the Pole Emploi, as has been my husband when he used them. I found work practically straight away and the Pole Emploi told me how to apply for a back to work travel grant as I had taken a job so far away - all of 35km! My husband has had nothing but help from the Pole Emploi and the Chambre de Metiers and is now firmly established running his own business. I have also been very sucessful in acquiring jobs, once a speculative letter, one I knocked on the door and asked for (and got) and my current job I applied for, from a newspaper advert. However, what all my jobs have had in common, is that I have taken a much lower level of job than I would have if I was in an English speaking country. My spoken French is fairly fluent but my written French is poor and that is what is holding me back, not xenophobic attitudes. When you can complete on an equal footing with the local people, in every way and still not get a job, then I think you can imply that they are treating you differently due to your nationality. I don't live in a major tourist centre either, I live in Burgundy which has one of the highest levels of unemployment, although to be fair, it doesn't have high levels of foreigners either. Millie, if you speak French, have the right attitudes and are willing to do anything - and I mean anything, you will find a job. Then once you start, the only way is up.

My spoken French is fairly fluent but my written French is poor
Mine isn't
I can and didn't except like you at a greatly inferior pay scale.

The only 'help' I had from the ANPE (Now Pole Emploi) was to be sent on a compulsory course on how to write a CV.

My previous job was training young people how to write CVs.Smile [:)]

How do you know that is isn't xenophobic attitudes that are holding you back?

For example why do wine producers  or Restaurants prefer to have their web sites translated into English  by French people who are obviously not native speakers of English, with the laughable results one sometimes sees?

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
   Report   Reply Quote

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most Read

Enter our competitions

Win books, DVDs, travel and even holidays in France in our great competitions! Take a look at our latest competitions…

Enter now

Join us on social media

France magazine
Living France magazine
French Property News magazine