French Language

Topic has 21 replies.
Print Search Sort Posts:

Re: Poil de carotte

I didn't read it like that, how wrong am I? Could someone explain in simple terms please.

 

Bare headed Ginger, wearing his brother Felix's old clothes. Red hair (that is confusing). He gives some grass to his rabbit after he cuts it with a hoe in the courtyard.

 

And that is how I read it. I used to hate my kids english home work, I never knew what the teachers wanted, they must have, to get a 'very well' as a remark.


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Poil de carotte

Oh Idun you made me laugh so hard I started to cry ....time for a rest me thinks.......!! You know thats my biggest problem in life ...Never knowing what people want !! (2 winks )
Dirty Tom =^..^=
Where ever I lay my paw thats my home

I support SPA Carcassonne ...go get a dog today
http://spacarcassonne.e-monsite.com/
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Poil de carotte

I love a good laugh at bedtime, is there anything better than going to sleep smilingBig Smile [:D] Bonne Nuit, fais de beaux reves.


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Poil de carotte

 Pads wrote:

This is the setting of the scene bit before people start talking ....

Poil de Carrotte, nu-tête, porte les vieux vêtements de son frère Félix. Cheveux roux. Il donne  de l'herbe à son lapin. Apres il vient couper avec une pioche les herbes de la cour.

I have a few observations to add to the confusion although perhaps the key is in the setting of the scene bit above.

It could be venir de but if so then the de is definitely missing

The full stop and capital A in apres that follows it rather rules out "he gives the grass to his rabbit after he has just cut it........." The punctuation would make the meaning:

"He is giving (he gives) the grass to his rabbit.  After (wards) he cuts the grass in the yard with a pioche"

Have you copied the text correctly Pads or was it perhaps an audio tape.

I always read Pad's postings and the dicussions with interest, it makes me question my understanding and I usually always learn something, this time is that I have always mis-spelt the he/she conjugation of venir, and no doubt other ir verbs, I have always missed the T.


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Poil de carotte

Morning Chancer

Jusr read it again and checked all the full stops and capitals and except for the one's on Poil de Carrotte they are all in the right place . So I think your point of the full stop and the capital on A , Is right he did feed the Rabbit then go and cut the grass...... or in this case comes and cuts the grass .... Another thought I have had is because this is the bit that sets the scene it is some times told in this manner isnt it ? Im sure I have read it like this before in english plays, to make you feel like you are actually there .... What do you think ?

Hope this makes sence ?? (confused wink)  


Dirty Tom =^..^=
Where ever I lay my paw thats my home

I support SPA Carcassonne ...go get a dog today
http://spacarcassonne.e-monsite.com/
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Poil de carotte

Yes it does make sense that way, if it is read as the setting of the scene. The "comes" probably is because the scene to be acted out is in the courtyard, it may start something like "its a shame I have just fed my rabbit, he could have helped me"

Except the seperate sentence containing nothing but "red hair" completely throws me whether I am wearing my English or French head!


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Poil de carotte

Yes the red hair bit throws me too...but I think its just making sure you realise he has red hair ( in case you didnt get that by his name) as later on he says his mum tells him its good for him to go out in the full mid day sun to work , because she dosnt like him !!!

Next bit that has got me ... I believe... Sois tranquille means... be quiet, but can it also be used to answer a question, so to assure some one ?

eg You will call me wont you ? ........ Sois tranquille ( rest assure ?) would that make sence ?     


Dirty Tom =^..^=
Where ever I lay my paw thats my home

I support SPA Carcassonne ...go get a dog today
http://spacarcassonne.e-monsite.com/
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Poil de carotte

Sois tranquille = be calm/peacefull, - present imperative tense but the gentle kind of imperative which is why I didnt use the exclamation mark.

Calme-toi! A bit more direct like a scouser "Calm down, Calm down"

On va se calmer! -_ Used to diffuse a situation

Ne t'inquiete pas / Ne vous inquietez  pas would more commonly be used to say "dont worry" in the I will phone you context.

Or I suppose "sois tranquille, tu peut compter sur moi"


   Report   Reply Quote

Most Read

Enter our competitions

Win books, DVDs, travel and even holidays in France in our great competitions! Take a look at our latest competitions…

Enter now

Join us on social media

France magazine
Living France magazine
French Property News magazine