French Language

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Re: Can one of the French people

Chloé is clearly a boy, and the word "enlevée" is the one with the wrong agreement. ;-)

Angela
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Re: Can one of the French people

 You can call me Betty wrote:
And if anyone can satisfactorily explain why my village holds la fête de LA St Louis each year ( none of my French friends seem to be able to) I would be soooo grateful.


They have that at Sète too...
http://www.saintlouisasete.fr/

Thanks for the confirmation, as I was strictly taught that a past participle  agrees with the gender and number of a PDO (preceding Direct Object)..

It nags at you however when you see what you think to be a mistake in a original French source.

I tried to work out an answer to la St Louis
I wonder if Saint(e) is one of those words that changes gender according to meaning or usage?
Is it always la Fête de la   saint  with all male names( Jean Raymond Henri etc spring to mind?
In wrestling with this I came across this which has some of those infuriating peculiarities that always made me want to give up French at school

http://www.bertrandboutin.ca/Folder_151_Grammaire/E_d_genre_certains_noms.htm

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: Can one of the French people

 Loiseau wrote:
Chloé is clearly a boy, and the word "enlevée" is the one with the wrong agreement. ;-) Angela

 

Cholé is definitely a girl, found in the boot of a car by german police........

RH, in Chambery there is an hotel, called Hotel Le France, there is a big sign above it and when we used to drive past, I always thought it looked wrong and odd........ but I'm not good at working this stuff out.


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Re: Can one of the French people

To the OP , it is definitely a mistake. It should have been " délivrée" .

As for la St jean, la St pierre, etc... That s what we say, though , I can't explain why...

AS for Le France, it sounds OK to me, it is the hotel ( masculine) that is LE France...


Life has a habit of biting you on the bum in ways that you least expect.............



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Re: Can one of the French people

I concur with the other French natives about "délivrée"

 

. As for "la Saint Jean", "la Saint-Glinglin", etc, I think the feminine article refers to "la fête de..." which is left out as a shortcut - so instead of saying "la fête de la Saint Jean", you simply say "la Saint Jean".


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Re: Can one of the French people

 Christine Animal wrote:

Yes, that's another one Betty, I think they always say la Saint Jean too.

Now Sweets, if it was les policiers it would be délivrés, not délivré.  But it's not the policiers, it's la fille qu'ils ont délivrée as in la lettre que j'ai reçue.  Ils l'ont délivrée.  Has my messy mind explained that clear enough (or should that be clearly enough   Confused [8-)]  )  ?

 

Thank you, Christine.  I think I've got it now.  So, it's the sort of sentence that is like this one: ç'est mois qui suis au fond? Smile [:)]

I was confused by the 2 subjects of Chloe and les policiers.

 I am VERY envious of those  of you who have had a proper grounding in French grammar in school.  A lot of things learnt at a young age seems to stick usefully in the mind in later life.

 

edit:  Better get on with genning up on les relatifs again, I guess Blink [blink]


Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Re: Can one of the French people

 5-element wrote:

I concur with the other French natives about "délivrée"

 

. As for "la Saint Jean", "la Saint-Glinglin", etc, I think the feminine article refers to "la fête de..." which is left out as a shortcut - so instead of saying "la fête de la Saint Jean", you simply say "la Saint Jean".



But they don't, 5-E, that's what is so odd. If anything, they leave out the first "La", so that the signs and fliers often read "Fete de la St Louis"
Frenchie says what most of the people I've subjected to my little inquisition on the subject have said: "It just is, OK?"Big Smile [:D] Apparently I am told, although I confess to having limited access to French TV and not having paid attention when I do, the announcement of whichever saint's day is next, which is usually at the end of some weather forecasts, uses the same thing and here (as you suggest) they leave out the whole preamble and just go for "demain nous sommes la St Pierre" It foxes me completely, because Some explanations get a bit woolly (sorry, Woolly) and people have tried to convince me that all saints' names take "la" but then we get into complex discussions about whether there is (or should be) "Saint" and "Sainte".....

It all seemed quite simple, this language lark, but let me tell you it goes downhill fast not long after "Monsieur Dumesnil fume une pipe"


Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
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Re: Can one of the French people

 sweet 17 wrote:
I'm going to stick my neck out and say that "délivré" refers to les policiers and that the sentence is OK.
In your example, Christine, the subject is "la lettre" and not "je" and therefore you need reçue.


Dear Sweet, you've just lost your head!

I'm with the other French natives! Big Smile [:D]


In Christine's example ("la lettre que j'ai reçue..."), je is the subject and lettre is the complément d'objet.

If you were to say "La lettre que Christine a reçue...", it is clear that Christine (sujet) has received (verbe) a letter (complément d'objet).
(and the fact that letter cannot receive anything...)

Expanding further, in both sentences above, que represents the letter and the rule used here is:
Le participe passé employé avec avoir s’accorde avec le complément d’objet direct quand celui-ci est placé avant le verbe.




Clair
En Deuil - 8 Nov. 16

Share your knowledge. It is a way to achieve immortality.
Dalai Lama


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