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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

My first response to "à priori" would be "as far as we know" ..... whether this is right or not, is another paire de manches!

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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

Clair

What an elegant sentence ... sometimes French does (but not always!) say it better!

Judith
ex W1, via 47 and 11 and now [just] in 34, equidistant from Carcassonne, Narbonne and Béziers, where I hope we'll finally stay!!

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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

And here's another expression that could confuse English speakers; à rigueur 

It's not like de rigueur familier to us as in "it's the done thing" or "comme il faut".

Nothing like so straightforward.  I think it equates to something like "at a push" or, in French, à la limite.

For example, you don't want to do something but you agree à rigueur but, it's the most I am prepared to go.  That's to say, so far and no further.

So, French contributors, have I got the sense right?

Anglophone contributors, please help to keep this thread going or we will lose it and we stand to gain so much by learning some of these (to us) obtuse expressions!


Sovereignty: the right to eat cholorinated chicken.
from The Little Book of Brexit Bo ll oc ks
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

The word I place a very heavy reliance on is hélas  -  especially to begin phrases.

Dictionaries may deprecate it as 'literary or humorous', but it has this great advantage:  used early enough in a sentence  -  however badly expressed  -  it gives the gesticulating interlocutor a clear impression that the answer is going to boil down to NO.



"M. Jérôme démasqua ses batteries: il resterait au lit."

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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

Sweets, I think it should be à LA rigueur?  To me, that's "at a pinch" or "at a push"

Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

I think Betty is right... à la rigeur



I would add another word that since I became aware of its apparent incongruity to English eyes I have noticed more and more
Confronter/confrontation..

It often seems to have a gentler sense in French than in English
confronter can be used to mean 'compare with' or to 'be taken into account alongside' as in
 à confronter avec les résultats de la prise de sang (to be looked at together with the blood test results)

and une confrontation means  bringing two people together to compare their versions of the facts (often used as a technique by the Police where the victim/accuser is brought face to face with the alleged perpetrator )
so might be said to be a 'face to face'



The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

Gengulphus, how can I ever fail now (after your excellent explanation) to forget to begin sentences with "hélas" in order to signal my intention right at the outset?Big Smile [:D]  Nice linguistic device and I will try it out very soon, to gauge its effects!

Betty, and Norman, thanks for à la rigueur; I don't think that I always listen as carefully as I might.

Confronter is useful to know though I can't say that I have paid it much attention.

The one I really like is cohabitation in the political sense.  For example, a right- and a left-wing politician working together to achieve results. I suppose that, in English, we do say, oh, don't they make very odd bedfellows?

It's one of the rare senses in which getting into bed with someone else doesn't necessarily lead to anything to do with sex?


Sovereignty: the right to eat cholorinated chicken.
from The Little Book of Brexit Bo ll oc ks
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

 sweet 17 wrote:

The one I really like is cohabitation in the political sense.  For example, a right- and a left-wing politician working together to achieve results. I suppose that, in English, we do say, oh, don't they make very odd bedfellows?

It's one of the rare senses in which getting into bed with someone else doesn't necessarily lead to anything to do with sex?

Can we be sure of that given some of our present day politiciansBig Smile [:D]
"There are some causes worth dying for - there are no causes worth killing for" Albert Camus
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