French Education

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Re: Dyslexic Child

Well I had a dyslexic son who went through the full french education system, he was born in France and we the parents are both english.

Firstly, I would say never move a teen to France. Yes, I know that there are some kids that do OK when they move to France in their teens, but as a general rule I would say do not do it. What with all their main exams coming up it is so important for their future and you are thinking about moving them to a different country/language/culture where even the basics are done differently, ie division is done differently.

The Riff Raff Elemement wrote to me some time ago and said that much had changed where he lived with regards to dyslexic children and I was glad to hear it. He lives in western France and I used to live in the SE and from what I hear from friends, not much has changed where I used to live.

Look on the APEDYS and CORIDYS web sites. All in french, but believe me, you need very good french to sort a 'troubled' child out when living in France, so your french will have to be up to it. All the paper work and people to contact and see who may or may not help. Apedys have a forum where you can ask questions, but be warned, problems are discussed.

Us, well, my almost thirty year old intelligent son has a morbid fear of teachers and any learning at all. I understand his 'fear', he would rather do nothing than risk at best, failing, and at worst, being the object of ridicule and humiliation. Basically he is damaged goods and cannot get over it......... that is what we live with everyday, even now.



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Re: Dyslexic Child

WB is talking a lot of sense.
There is a lot of emphasis on the 'programme' and little focus on the needs of the individual.
There is also a slavish attention to 'notes' (marks) and 'le moyen' (the average)
Remember that these are at the mercy of the individual teacher who may or may not be sympathetic.

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: Dyslexic Child

Hello Missy,

I would echo what idun has already said. Certainly things are better for dyslexic and special needs children than perhaps they used to be (I have school aged children, and I have been involved in the education system as a parent representative for some years), but the system, nonetheless, is geared to children who speak French in the first place.

With the best will in the world, a 13 year old is not going to pick up the language nearly as quickly as a younger child. I've heard numerous times of 16 year old children arriving, becoming seamlessly bilingual in six weeks and then qualifying as doctors, vets or engineers in record time, however I myself have never met one of these titans. My experience, conversely, (and I think this is rather more general) is that most children brought here after the age of about 7 never truly catch up and often don't fulfil their potential.

If your move is not an optional one, I would imagine homeschool would be your best choice, though this does mean that your daughter wouldn't get the exposure to the language in the same way. I know very little about homeschooling in France - it doesn't seem to be that widely practised - but I'm sure there's plenty of information out there. I seem to recall there was a group of Brits somewhere in the South West who set up some kind of homeschooling network, though I think they spent a fair amount of time beating off the authorities who wanted to check whether the children were getting an adequate education. It might be worth trying to find them.

Jon
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Re: Dyslexic Child

 idun wrote:

Us, well, my almost thirty year old intelligent son has a morbid fear of teachers and any learning at all. I understand his 'fear', he would rather do nothing than risk at best, failing, and at worst, being the object of ridicule and humiliation. Basically he is damaged goods and cannot get over it......... that is what we live with everyday, even now.

And from what I have seen working part time at the lycée even with the kindest of teachers the system is exactly that, I have sat in during tests and some of them will only right their name on the page and then put their head in their hands and go into a sort of depressed sleep.

These same kids during group sessions (maximum half a class) are quite bright and involve themselves, when I look over their shoulder whilst helping them with written exercises often their scribble is incomprehensible, in fact when they read out their answers you can see them struggling to read their own words, there is I believe a significant degree of illitericism and/or dyslexism although I cannot judge, they are almost 100% from very poor deprived backgrounds, although certainly not poor in alcohol, cigarettes, mobile phones etc.

The first thing we have to teach them is how to socialise and interact with each other without aggression as many of them will be boarders at the internat, we take them away on a cycling/camping trip with other activities in their first few weeks, many of them have never eaten at a table and dont know how to use or even hold cutlery.

To the OP, unless your French is superb and also your knowledge of all the other subjects and teaching skills, and by your home schooling you can take this child to an amazing level of fluency as well as competence in the other core subjects all in French then I think that by moving at this time in the childs education is a very bad idea for their future employment prospects and life in general.

Editted, I am getting dyslexic myself whilst typing in English, when I read the posting I see that I have written "right" instead of "write", this is happening more and more, I hope its just something to do with being in 100% immersion.


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