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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

I thought of this thread the last two times I bought leeks from Lidl at some cheap-as-chips price.

What I noticed was that they were very clean, no soil, no grit, just very good-looking but I have to agree that they do not smell much.  However, turned into soup, the soup tasted very nice.

I think they must be growing these hydroponically and that that might be why even the roots of the leeks (very short roots) are clean as a whistle.

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Smile [:)]

Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Glad your soup was nice, Minty.

I became so exercised about these damned leeks, I contacted the National Leek Grower's Association, or somesuch...didn't receive the courtesy of a reply.

Angela nailed the cause, earlier in this thread. And I researched it.

Varieties grown for resistance to pests fungal attacks etc. Greater crop weight; and little if any flavour.

Simple old cove me; as Michel Roux is wont to say, "Where's the flavour?"

Still, today, later on, I am making Chinese style Chicken and Sweetcorn soup. Mrs Gluey boiled up a chicken carcass; loads of nice little bits of white meat. Onions, sautéed till transparent; root ginger, garlic, a decent chicken stock cube, strain the liquor, to partially clarify; in with the little bits of chicken and sweetcorn, add a very few egg noodles and scatter some bits of green scallion sliced thin and Bob's your oncle!

Big Smile [:D]

Beer [B]


"Yes, but that apart, Mrs Lincoln, did you enjoy the play?"

Gluestick
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Sounds very good.  The only thing I would add is some chilli but that's just me Stick out tongue [:P]

I fancied some of my leeks at the weekend but there was a little problem.
I have grown them in raised beds (and yes they could be bigger because I didn't water them enough) but I couldn't get the damn things out as the ground had frozen solid.
After a lot of hacking I liberated a few.  They tasted good but maybe that was because of the hard work to get them!

Do not believe anything until it has been officially denied
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

We've only once grown leeks, and that was by mistake. Husband bought some to plant from the market, thinking they were spring onions. The leaves were ok.
I used to like small leeks baked with a cheese sauce. Otherwise I don't see the point of them, much prefer onions. We grow a lot of those, different kinds.

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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

I still think it very strange to have leeks without any grit or soil particles between the leaves. 

Strange how some silly little thing could stick in your mind but I remember Glenys Kinnock being asked on TV how to properly clean leeks.  She said you had to slice lengthwise as far down as you can and clean under a running tap...........duh, no wonder I don't remember anything important as my poor old brain is filled with inconsequential rubbish!

Now that we are on this mind-boggling subject, can you tell me how much of the green bits you retain to eat?  I discard most of the green bits, only using the very delicate pale green bits near the stem.  My neighbour happened to be in my house once when I was doing this and she tut-tutted loudly and gathered up all the discarded bits to take home with her!  I didn't know where to look as I felt thoroughly shamed.

Same goes for the thick stalks of cauliflowers and of broccoli.  I have done as some TV cooks suggested, that you peel them and use all of the stalk.  But I simply do not like the stalks so I continue to lop off all the large stalks and just eat the florets with only small bits of tender stalks.  In France, they do sell you such vegetables having trimmed them minimally and most of the stalks and soil are still on the veg; but I like that because I think this helps to prolong the veg's life.

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

 Pierre ZFP wrote:
Sounds very good.  The only thing I would add is some chilli but that's just me Stick out tongue [:P]




Of course, Pierre; so do I!

Senior moment or perhaps the mound of client stuff on my desk this morning....again!

Sigh.

Sad [:(]

"Yes, but that apart, Mrs Lincoln, did you enjoy the play?"

Gluestick
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Mint, I'm like you with leeks, take all the green off, though I think the French might soup / stew the tops.  Likewise stalks of brocoli and cauli). I tried once, but found them tough.  I like onions (though they don't always like me!), but tend to buy leeks sometimes for a little extra flavour as OH won't eat onions but seems to tolerate leeks. Last one I bought, from the local market, was less flavoursome than expected, but it was late in the season and I suspect I'd kept it too long before I cooked it!

I did "steam" a small head of brocoli in the top of the slow cooker above the meat and with the potatoes (also steaming gently) and actually found the stalk quite tasty, though it no longer had green florets by that time ... but again that was getting old ... another veg OH won't eat.!!



Judith
ex W1, via 47 and 11 and now [just] in 34, equidistant from Carcassonne, Narbonne and Béziers, where I hope we'll finally stay!!

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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Also, I love a buttery leek omelette.

Patf, I nearly agree about your "why leeks" question.  However, I do have a Welsh husband and I think leeks remind him of his childhood mealsWink [;-)]

Plus, they do cook more quickly than onions if you are in a hurry!Smile [:)]

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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