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Re: Cream cheese in France.

There are thousands of recipes on the web for cheesecake and many do not separate the eggs. Of the  few I looked at, many said was to continue beating the mix when the cream is added.

Ofcourse they have not taken into account french cream, and as Chancer said, maybe mascapone would be a solution....... although when I make tiramisu, I find that the mix of cream and mascapone tend to become a little 'slack' I believe would be the word,and not thicken as I always hope it would.

Personally I would not use creme fraiche, I do not like the acidity of it. I always used elle et vire full cream in a box that I had well refridgerated.


My son uses some gelatine in his cheesecake.

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Re: Cream cheese in France.

 Patf wrote:
No, I didn't separate the eggs - that must be the reason it went liquid. Didn't know that.
What do you use as a base, pomme?
As I said, we've used the Heston recipe successfully many times. In the UK digestive biscuits and here usually langues de chat - both crushed and merged with butter.

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Re: Cream cheese in France.

I dont use any thickeners, a real bodge and cop out IMHO, I seperate the whites and whip them just short of merangue consistency, stiff peaks, then the cream must be whipped to the same consitency which is where all French creams fail, not a high enough fat content.

 

The egg yolks are mixed with the cream cheese, castor sugar and any other ingrédients  plus gelatine, so I do use a thickener Stick out tongue [:P] and the egg whites carefully folded in then the whipped double cream is folded in, if I were to use fromage blanc it would become a runny mess plus in my recipé at least you need the rich taste of the cream which fromage blanc does not have.

 

I am a fan of fromage blanc though, I make my own and get through 3 kg a week!!!!

 

Maybe I will try it in a cheesecake one day, trouble is its my best creation but I no longer eat any sugars so I only make it for others.


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Re: Cream cheese in France.

Do I get the feeling some don't seem to know the difference between a "New York-style" baked cheesecake (which the OP talked about) and a no-bake cheesecake?
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Re: Cream cheese in France.

You are correct, and I still wont know the difference if you dont explain!


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Re: Cream cheese in France.

Yes, I was trying to make New York style. I know about no-bake cheesecakes - we used to live in a Jewish community and it's traditional there to have cheesecake at this time of the year. Many people had given up trying to make the baked type and made non-baked.
There was one lady who did catering, and I ended up buying one from her. She made a light sponge base, and the topping was more like a baked custard with a lemon-cheesey flavour.

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Re: Cream cheese in France.

Re thickening a non baked one with gelatine. My son is a chef, in fact he was actually a Chef in a good restaurant in a major european city, and not a cuistot or a sous chef etc etc although initially he was a sous chef.  His cheesecake looked like it should and I was assured that it was absolutely delicious..... but not for me, at all. So not a cop out etc.

OK I'll bite, why langue de chat, which are nothing like digestives at all in either taste or texture????

And yes, I missed the baked bit. Here is Heston's recipe, it should be a live link.  He thickens his with cornflour. In fact looking at these recipes for a baked one, they do thicken in some way or another.

http://www.insearchofheston.com/2013/11/how-to-make-hestons-baked-vanilla-cheesecake-recipe-from-family-food/


Good luck Patf. Look on the BBC Food web site too.

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Re: Cream cheese in France.

idun: That link is the same as the one I gave earlier (the bold text was a live link). It comes from the book Family Food: A New Approach to Cooking by Heston Blumenthal.

Langues de chat are easily available in France and as far as we're concerned make a good substitute when crushed (other biscuits are available). The base doesn't really matter too much as the mix soaks into it to a certain extent and changes the texture. So a sponge base would be OK. American recipes often suggest using Graham crackers but you will also find references to pastry bases.

Don't over-beat the fromage blanc mix and just fold in the egg whites to keep it light. Don't be tempted to over-bake because it doesn't look done - it will tend to dry too much and to develop fissures. And leave it in the oven for several hours to cool down slowly (best done in evening for an overnight cooling).

Chancer: a baked cheesecake in basically a baked custard. An unbaked cheesecake in basically a mousse .
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