French Language

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Re: PC

Betty - the one about the language school was based on the Hyman Kaplan books by Leo Rosten. Most of which I read and found funny at the time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyman_Kaplan
As for offensive language - I dislike the regular use of 'swear' words but no-one would take any notice if I asked for a ban.

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Re: PC

I still have no idea what the fuss was about.

Life was different years ago, and that was just the way it was.


Should we ignore it, ban it, apologise for it........... I am sick to death of all the apology stuff........ next we'll be asking the Italians to apologise for the romans invading, or the Scandinavians for the Vikings invading.


History is what it WAS. We should ignore it at our peril, but never apologise for it, or ban it, or ignore it.

I have only seen one comic in concert and would you believe that that was Chubby Brown, I didn't know who he was when we went, as we went with friends. That was in 1980. Apart from the language, he was quite funny.

Never the less, I don't think bad language is necessary to make a comic funny, but some don't swear, and I find them  that dire, I do believe I end up swearing, muttering bad language under my breath when I see them. And sometimes, I cannot avoid them on tv, because humour is very individual and other family members like some that I cannot stand. Yes there are other rooms, but not necessarily as warm as our main living room where the tv is.






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Re: PC

It was all "of its time", of course, Idun. It's daft to apologise for something that was acceptable in its time, but I suppose it's indicative of the pace and trajectory of change that it's seen as unacceptable now, as it generally should be.
I can't see the Black and White Minstrel show being resurrected, for good reason.
I've collected "Tintin" books for years, and some of those are now seen in a very negative light, but at the time Hergé wrote them, the views expressed were very much the norm.
Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
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Re: PC

I don't think anyone has to apologise for the fact that it was shown then.. it was indicative of the time and in that sense it's interesting that times have changed and maybe people now don't find it funny anymore. I look at some things that I used to find funny or interesting in the 1980s and I can't understand why now.. but I did at the time. From what I read of it..the 'fuss' was by the media. A headmaster made, in his words, a poor choice of video clip to illustrate a point. A few parents complained, he apologised.. over and done with until the papers got hold of it and blew it up into a public incident! When I was at school the parents all complained about the sex education film we were shown. They thought it was too explicit, but because it wasn't really explicit enough none of us really understood it and so asked lots of awkward questions afterwards. Fortunately it never made the front pages of The Sun, as it would now.
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Re: PC

Last night I watched a kids cartoon film set in Antartica (well, bits of it anyway); some of the characters were huge, blubbery sea lions or somesort, crude, agressive foul mouthed creatures.
So far so good, but they spoke with strng Aussi accents which I find racist and not permitted. It implied that all Aussies are like this and I am sure I have met or seen one who is not, havent I? There is Peter Tatchell of course
🙈🙊🙉👹😜
Too thick for a PhD!
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Re: PC

Perhaps the thing with Love Thy Neighbour was / is that the two main characters were / are good friends

Goodness Gracious Me was a comedy series by Asians. For me it showed that Asians have a sense of humour especially taking the mickey out of 'white' people by their Friday night treat being 'going out for an English'.

Why does the BBC keep showing Dads Army? Well, I suppose it is cheap but perhaps it is for the acting or in some cases lack of it.

John Le Mesurier asked one of the writers how he should play the part. The writer later admitted that he thought John only had one way of acting. He told him to play it as he saw fit. John decided to play the part as himself.

Arthur Lowe would ask the writers for assurance that non of his personality was being used. Many people who knew hime concur that Arthur Lowe and Captain Mainwearing were one and the same.

John Laurie was the same as shown in the series.

Here there was good entertainment in which the most controversial moment was the Town Clerks pronunciation of 'fleshings'.

Another reason why they keep showing it is because a large number of people get a great deal of pleasure from watching it....perhaps you have guessed I am one.

As for 'Till Death Us Do Part' surely the writer was highlighting how bigoted some of the characters were.

As for Spike Milligan, his father was Irish and his mother English but was born in India where he spent his early life.

Some writers use swear words where there seems to be no need but in some situations it would seem very strange if a writer did not use swear words.
It is undemocratic to ask the people if a negotiated deal is what they want.

Then how can it be democratic to ask MPs for a third time if what they do not want is what they want?
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