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Re: Garden hedging

What do you need the hedge to do? Over the years I’ve cleared a huge amount of brambles and rough hedging and have replaced it where necessary in different ways. Along the longest side there was no need to do anything as once the brambles were cleared a low stone wall was exposed which is a great addition to the garden. Between my garden and my neighbour’s I constructed a post and rail fence using good quality wood and the final part has been allowed to grow into a wild hawthorn hedge as that provides the level of security that location needs.
Bamboo is a menace and should be avoided all all costs, unless it’s dead and being used for privacy.
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Re: Garden hedging

As a softy who hates anything with thorns, I am a big fan of beech for hedges. Kept trimmed, it makes a good strong boundary with year-round colour. Birds seem to like it, too. I am gradually replacing miles of leylandii with beech and wish I had done so years ago.
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Re: Garden hedging

 Flaneur wrote:
I'm not a gardener, so treat my suggestion with caution, but what about hawthorn? It's nice and thorny, so makes a good boundary. And anything thorny makes a safe refuge for nesting birds, and birds eat insects, so everyone's a winner!
Just ripped out loads of ugly hawthorn at great expense, not likely to put it back!

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Re: Garden hedging

  YCCMB wrote:
We had pyracantha at our last house, growing up by the side of the front door. All I can say is that the flowers smell like dead people. I guess if your hedge is far enough away from your house, it's not a problem.
Definitely don't want the smell of dead people but farther away sounds doable. We already have a yellow flowering bush that smells of sperm!

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Re: Garden hedging

 alittlebitfrench wrote:
Bamboo
Not a chance in hell! roots run riot BIL has a bamboo forest, not at all what I want but thanks for the input.

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Re: Garden hedging

 BritinBretagne wrote:
What do you need the hedge to do? Over the years I’ve cleared a huge amount of brambles and rough hedging and have replaced it where necessary in different ways. Along the longest side there was no need to do anything as once the brambles were cleared a low stone wall was exposed which is a great addition to the garden. Between my garden and my neighbour’s I constructed a post and rail fence using good quality wood and the final part has been allowed to grow into a wild hawthorn hedge as that provides the level of security that location needs. Bamboo is a menace and should be avoided all all costs, unless it’s dead and being used for privacy.
Long term I shall rebuild the fallen garden walls but I want natural screening but with a bit of colour and hopefully helping the natural order.  Put up so much fencing in my life for work but may well need this along one side. Hoping to plant was first thought.

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Re: Garden hedging

 Alan Zoff wrote:
As a softy who hates anything with thorns, I am a big fan of beech for hedges. Kept trimmed, it makes a good strong boundary with year-round colour. Birds seem to like it, too. I am gradually replacing miles of leylandii with beech and wish I had done so years ago.
Looks like a good suggestion to Alan, right up to the point I checked the price! Really would like some seasonal colour variation to.

Found a garden centre near me so will go and take a look but with around 300m to do I can vary the ideas.

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Re: Garden hedging

Absolutely NOOOOO to bamboo!

Have you thought of eleagnus ebingii? It comes in plain or variegated versions; is evergreen; grows fairly fast, but is easy to keep in check. And in the autumn it has a delicious fragrance, emanating from flowers so tiny that you almost can't see them.

I used to trim mine with hand shears (cos that's all I had); it does have slightly fuzzy undersides to the leaves that can be itchy on the skin for a few hours after you have lugged armfuls of trimmings to the compost heap. But on balance it makes an excellent hedge.


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