French Language

Topic has 5 replies.
Print Search Sort Posts:
Blink [blink]

Meaning of "on y est dessus"

Hi

I recently received an email containing the phrase "On y est dessus, tout remarchera cette semaine". Out of curiosity I checked my French dictionaries and search engines for a translation of "on y est dessus", but can't find one, yet it appears to be a common enough saying judging by the Google hits. Is it something like "above all"? Could someone put me out of my misery please? 
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Meaning of "on y est dessus"

I reckon the nearest equivalent is "we're on top of it".


"I couldn't sleep very well last night. Some noisy b*ggers going around in automobiles kept me awake." Ken Miles
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Meaning of "on y est dessus"

I agree. Something like 'we are on to it, and everything will be working again this week'

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Meaning of "on y est dessus"

Good to see you are too Norm . . .
the real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, and blindside you at 4pm on some idle Tuesday
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Meaning of "on y est dessus"

 Derek M wrote:
Hi

I recently received an email containing the phrase "On y est dessus, tout remarchera cette semaine". Out of curiosity I checked my French dictionaries and search engines for a translation of "on y est dessus", but can't find one, yet it appears to be a common enough saying judging by the Google hits. Is it something like "above all"? Could someone put me out of my misery please? 

This particular use of  'y' is a regional quirk found in several areas of France.
Although frequently used in colloquial, spoken French, the expression is grammatically incorrect and should not be used in written French (or even in spoken French Whistles [Www]...)


It is correctly used:
  • In general terms or abstract concepts (city, country ...), where "y" replaces a noun preceded by the preposition  à or en or chez.
    • Il va en Chine tous les ans - Il y va tous les ans (He goes to China every year - He goes there every year.)
    • Il pense partir à Paris. - Il y pense. (He's thinking of going to Paris - He's thinking about it.)
    • Il va chez le médecin. - Il y va (He is going to the doctor's. - He's going there)
  • With some verbs like penser (to think), songer (to think), se fier (to trust), s'intéresser (to be interested in) which cannot be preceded by lui or eux:
    • Elle pense à Nicolas - Elle y pense. (She think of Nicolas - She think of him.)
    • Il se fie à son médecin - Il s'y fie. (He trusts his doctor - He trusts him.)
Reading material.

Here endeth the French lesson... Stick out tongue [:P]

Clair
En Deuil - 8 Nov. 16

Share your knowledge. It is a way to achieve immortality.
Dalai Lama


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: Meaning of "on y est dessus"

Thanks all, and especially Clair, for making things clearer.

   Report   Reply Quote

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most Read

Enter our competitions

Win books, DVDs, travel and even holidays in France in our great competitions! Take a look at our latest competitions…

Enter now

Join us on social media

France magazine
Living France magazine
French Property News magazine