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Can someone translate please.

I was reading an account of a Chatentais man who was caught driving with 3 grams of alcohol in his blood and no driving licence for 42 years, this morning when I was surprised by a comment about the news item; as follows;

Pourquoi confisquer le véhicule de ce monsieur,on ne confisque jamais les véhicules de hautes gammes de ces richards anglais qui roulent pour s'amuser sur nos routes a plus de 250 Km/h

What are richards anglais? I can guess what they mean but I was wondering if it's just a stereotyping on the part of the commenter.

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Re: Can someone translate please.

fat cats ... English in this instance. It has the same slur as when used in English.

Sue

Computing - it's another world
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Re: Can someone translate please.

As many of the English that French people have as neighbours are second home owners  (and therefore have a certain amount of capital) there is a generalising of the idea that all English people in France are wealthy

I think 'richard'  is  a bit like 'clochard' or 'vicelard'...the 'ard' ending expresses a certain distaste.

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: Can someone translate please.

Thank you both, I just hadn't seen it in print like that before.

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Re: Can someone translate please.

Rhyming slang that lost its meaning and irony when crossing the channel

"Richard the thirds" = ?? Big Smile [:D]Devil [6]


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Re: Can someone translate please.

 NormanH wrote:
As many of the English that French people have as neighbours are second home owners  (and therefore have a certain amount of capital) there is a generalising of the idea that all English people in France are wealthy

I think 'richard'  is  a bit like 'clochard' or 'vicelard'...the 'ard' ending expresses a certain distaste.


This is quite likely -  enough people have sufficient English to know the word "rich" which is anyhow basically the same in French, and as NormanH says, putting the "ard" on is done often.  The fact that it also happens to be an English Christian name (yes, I know it's also used in French occasionally) would seem to be most appropriate to use it in that way.

Judith
ex W1, via 47 and 11 and now [just] in 34, equidistant from Carcassonne, Narbonne and Béziers, where I hope we'll finally stay!!

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Re: Can someone translate please.

Exactly!
When you add "-ard", this is very familiar and negative. Like a "bledard", who comes from a "bled", un village.

By the bye, a mistake: "...les véhicules haut de gamme..." (contrary : "bas de gamme")
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