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What does this mean?

In the village bar / tabac, whenever I leave after buying something, I say the usual (phonetically)...''Merci , au'voir'', the response from Mr Grumpy ( ! ) the bar owner is ''allez au'voir'' ( again, how it sounds, not necessarily the correct spelling)

Now I understand 'au'voir ' but not the prefix of ''allez'' with it.

I suppose it could be ''go - good bye'' or even a local version of ''*** off'' !!!!

Any ideas ?????????
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Re: What does this mean?

It doesn't really mean anything I don't think. It's a bit like saying "OK then, goodbye"
Often someone will reply allez to a question
'On mange un morceau?' (shall we have a bite to eat?)
to which the reply could well be 'Allez' (OK then)



The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: What does this mean?

I think it's just a way of terminating the conversation.

Yes, I am sure Norman is right.

edit
Even more confusing is the command "Allez - viens"



Cendrillon
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Re: What does this mean?

No direct translation and depends on the context it could be "right then.............." or "OK............................." or if its "Allez-y!" then its "lets go!"


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Re: What does this mean?

 Chancer wrote:

No direct translation and depends on the context it could be "right then.............." or "OK............................." or if its "Allez-y!" then its "lets go!"

Or, "you go ahead"; "off you go" when letting someone go in front of you, such as in a queue or through a door.

If I want to say "let's go", I'll probably say "on y va" or even "allons-y" if I am feeling gramatically pernickety!


N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: What does this mean?

I like 'allez'. I use it a lot. Allez for me has many uses. I understand it's many many uses. Some ofcourse may have been from my area of France, but it isn't as if it hasn't been understood elsewhere.

I would say Chancer that it implies more than just 'right then' or 'OK'. It means to come, to get a move on, an encouragement......... an example, encouraging someone to do something or drink or eat something.  There are many ways to use it. I have never thought about it before, but it is certainly part of my vocabulary. Maybe lazy french, but that is how people speak........

In the NE of England we use 'away' a lot too. Maybe that is why I like allezBig Smile [:D]. Years ago my Dad was working with a southerner, and this man was trying to back a lorry into a space that was a bit tight. My Dad was directing him, then the man heard my Dad shout, 'away, away, away' and he drove off and parked at the other side of the yard.


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Re: What does this mean?

You are right that there is a sense of movement in 'allez' which can be expected given its primary meaning.
' get on with it' for example, or "come on" when encouraging a team 'Allez les Bleus'
'Get a move on' in "Allez Coco"

I have always found it difficult to translate the singular version 'va' in phrases like "Avec le temps , avec le temps , va , tout s ' en va ."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=496ed3crJZc&feature=related

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: What does this mean?

When I walked with the randonneurs in CM, the leader would say, "on y va" after a stop for a drink of water and/or a pee as a way of rounding everyone up and a signal to get ready to move off.

I also noticed the one or two occasions when I have watched a table tennis match when OH was playing, that the arbitre (is that spelling right?) would say, "on y va" which I translate as OK, if you are both ready, we'll start the match.

Anyway, "on y va" just slips off the tongue, so I tend to say that.

If I'm just ready to leave and no one seems to want to move, I say "allez, je m'en vais!" which I feel is not too abrupt or, if I am the one holding everyone else up, I think it's a way to reassure people that I shan't be lingering!

 

 


N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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