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De plus, au plus and à plus

Can you confirm my understanding of these extracts from a government text, I think that I have it right now but initially saw it completely differently, I will underline the relevant bits and remove the uneccesary.

Art. 1er. - Les dispositions du présent arrêté s'appliquent:

aux bâtiments d'habitation y compris les logements-foyers dont le plancher bas du logement le plus haut est situé au plus à 50 mètres au-dessus du sol utilement accessible aux engins des services de secours et de lutte contre l'incendie;

Les règles particulières concernant les immeubles d'habitation dont le plancher bas du logement le plus haut est situé à plus de 50 mètres au-dessus du sol Classement des bâtiments d'habitation

Art. 3. - Les bâtiments d'habitation sont classés comme suit du point de vue de la sécurité-incendie:

1° Première famille:

habitations individuelles isolées ou jumelées à un étage sur rez-de-chaussée, au plus;

2° Deuxième famille:

habitations individuelles isolées ou jumelées de plus d'un étage sur rez-de-chaussée;

habitations collectives comportant au plus trois étages sur rez-de-chaussée.

So I think that above "au plus à 50 metres" means no more than 50 metres

à plus de 50 metres means more than 50 meters.

un étage sur rez-de-chaussée, au plus. Means no more than one floor above the ground floor.

de plus d'un etage sur rez-de-chausée. Means more than one floor above the ground floor.

And the last "au plus" like the others, no more than. 


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Re: De plus, au plus and à plus

 Chancer wrote:
aux bâtiments d'habitation y compris les logements-foyers dont le plancher bas du logement le plus haut est situé au plus à 50 mètres au-dessus du sol utilement accessible aux engins des services de secours et de lutte contre l'incendie;

= at the most

 Chancer wrote:
Les règles particulières concernant les immeubles d'habitation dont le plancher bas du logement le plus haut est situé à plus de 50 mètres au-dessus du sol Classement des bâtiments d'habitation

= beyond / further than

 Chancer wrote:
habitations individuelles isolées ou jumelées à un étage sur rez-de-chaussée, au plus;

= at the most

 Chancer wrote:
habitations individuelles isolées ou jumelées de plus d'un étage sur rez-de-chaussée

= above / more than

 Chancer wrote:
habitations collectives comportant au plus trois étages sur rez-de-chaussée.

= at the most

 Chancer wrote:
So I think that above "au plus à 50 metres" means no more than 50 metres,
"à plus de 50 metres" means more than 50 meters,
"un étage sur rez-de-chaussée, au plus" means no more than one floor above the ground floor,
"plus d'un etage sur rez-de-chausée" means more than one floor above the ground floor,
And the last "au plus" like the others, no more than.

Well done Chancer!


Clair
En Deuil - 8 Nov. 16

Share your knowledge. It is a way to achieve immortality.
Dalai Lama


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Re: De plus, au plus and à plus

Merci Clair.

A plus Wink [;-)]


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Re: De plus, au plus and à plus

I'll add my contribution en plus Smile [:)]  (more for others than for you since you got it all right)

http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa101300.htm
The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: De plus, au plus and à plus

'Plus', one of my very first confusing french words.

PLUS......... that is what they would say in shops and my brain would think it meant more......... only it doesn't, it means no more.

I suppose I should have known from gaming... rien ne va plus......Blink [blink]


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Re: De plus, au plus and à plus

Some lessons you learn very early on and never forget, in a brasserie I wanted another beer with my meal "plus de biére S.V.P" said I, the response was 'Deja fait!" as she took away my glass never for it to be returnedSad [:(]

En plus and quand même were others that really got me scratching my head, I had never used moreover in spoken English to my knowledge, now I cant stop myself from using it to the amusement of my friends and family, see the thread on the english footballer!


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Re: De plus, au plus and à plus

Chance, j'en ai plus (or whatever the right phrase is) but I want you to know that I did send you a PM, as promised, last night and I wonder whether you have seen/read it?

à plus tard, alors.....

 


Sovereignty: the right to eat cholorinated chicken.
from The Little Book of Brexit Bo ll oc ks
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Re: De plus, au plus and à plus

 Chancer wrote:
…in a brasserie I wanted another beer with my meal "plus de biére S.V.P" said I, the response was 'Deja fait!" as she took away my glass never for it to be returned…

I don't know any good solution to the "plus" problem in written French, but there is sometimes a clue in pronunciation.  If the 's' is pronounced, I think it usually has a positive meaning, i.e. "some more" rather than "no more."

Maybe one of our French friends can confirm this, but I believe that if you had sounded the 's' – especially if you made it more like a 'z' – you would have got your second beer (or third, or fifth, or whatever it was.)  Pluz de bière, s'il vous plaît.  Try it next time and see what happens.

PS: on further thought, I don't think this would work before a vowel, when you would have to pronounce the 's' anyway.  E.g. you would pronounce the 's' in "plus un mot, s.v.p." but I think it could mean either "let's have another word" or "not another word!"  Again, can anyone confirm this?



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