Earning a Living

Topic has 23 replies.
Print Search Sort Posts:

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

The children of a friend of ours, although English by birth, who have gone through the French school system-to listen to them and speak to them, you would believe them French. However, once into the job market, the elder daughter has had mega problems, because as she says, once they see your CV and see you were born in England, that is it, interview terminated - also friends in our village, she is from Belgium, he from France, also say the same - he could not get a job in Belgium, and now they are back here, she can not get a job in France!!!!
Now we're retired, how the heck did we have time to hold down jobs as well?
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

I am so glad to hear that the Pole d'Emploi in Burgundy is better.  I know it's an area of high unemployment, so it's great to hear that some Brits do succeed.  The initial people at the Pole d'Emploi were great, really nice, and shocked when I told them what had occurred on their course.  Maybe the course administrator was just a horrid hag from hell who didn't like the look of me.  However, having read the replies on here, I was sadly not too surprised.  Some years ago my sister tried to work here, teaching English - bearing in mind she has two MAs, one in English Literature, and one in Linguistics and is a qualified teacher with oodles of experience, she thought she might find work.  She was told several times that French people are better at teaching English, and this seemed to be an accepted given. I just somehow figured that time had moved on, and things may have changed. 

I will find work - the course at the Pole d'Emploi made me realise just how horribly capable I am!  So there was a positive outcome!  My main fear is that having read some of the responses, I worry for my son.  He has always been teased at school about having foreign parents, but I now realise that these teasings may be more than just kids being horrid. 

I have determined that by Christmas I shall be an employed and fully functioning worker at something or another, even if I have to build my own factory and production line, in order to give myself a job pushing a button!  The only question now is whether or not I want to be accepted as part of a society, that I had previously thought I was accepted into?


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

I had a student (here in the UK) who had, like a lot of younger French people, come to the UK to work. She had (probably still has) a good job in the marketing department of the UK subsidiary of a US company.

I asked her why she'd come here to the UK to work. Her explanation was that she simply couldn't find work in France. French-born, French-educated......but she explained that she would phone companies who had advertised vacancies and would be given lots of positive vibes, even, on occasions, interviews would be arranged. And then she'd have to give her name. Well, her parents are Moroccan. Usually the vacancy would miraculously be filled.

Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

I saw a program on that very issue recently, where the children of immigrant parents or even grandparents, but born and bred in France had decided to change their names to make them ( their names) more French and it did help them in the job market.

There is the option to change both the first and surname for people wishing to gain French nationality, it would be interesting to know how many people opt to do that.

 


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

Bloke fired recently in france for refusing his bosses order to change his name from Mohammed to Alexandre.
   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

We know several people locally whose children have found work in UK. The parents regret they've had to go there, but know it's made sense. These are all local families, born, bred and educated here, with good qualifications. They don't have the burden of non-French names either.


Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.


   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

The chef I had in the restaraunt this season was an arab. However, he went by another name (not legally changed, he just used it socially, all his contracts etc were in his real name) He told me he was forced to do this as very few people would want an arab preparing their food.



   Report   Reply Quote

Re: I did go down the Pole d'Emploi Route

http://www.france-info.com/france-societe-2010-10-08-degage-sale-arabe-un-patient-d-origine-marocaine-porte-plainte-contre-490088-9-12.html

Last year an internet provider sent a letter to a customer of N african and addressed it Cher sale arabe
   Report   Reply Quote

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most Read

Enter our competitions

Win books, DVDs, travel and even holidays in France in our great competitions! Take a look at our latest competitions…

Enter now

Join us on social media

France magazine
Living France magazine
French Property News magazine