Earning a Living

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Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications

 Judith wrote:
You might not need French to work as an English teacher, but you certainly need it to live here.....even in a big city.

The total knowledge of french by the majority of elderly UK expats could be put on the back of a postage stamp.Woot! [:-))]


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Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications

 Judith wrote:
You might not need French to work as an English teacher, but you certainly need it to live here.....even in a big city.

Plus you need to get through the interview, probably conducted in FRENCH, in order to get the job?


N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications

Why not start off by trying to find a job teaching English as a foreign language in England?
This is the time of year when all the language schools are recruiting for the season ahead.

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Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications

 sweet 17 wrote:
Plus you need to get through the interview, probably conducted in FRENCH, in order to get the job?

When I was unexpectedly asked if I would be prepared to undertake a project to teach English to Roumanians I simply said 'Yes'  -  in French, as it happened. 

Can you start next week ?  Err…  no  -  I have a cat, a life and an aged parent to consider.  I will start in January. 

I devised and administered a suitable placement test, marked it, arranged the classes, planned the lessons, networked at a dinner party to get someone to donate a very large whiteboard, and began teaching the initial sixty candidates (of all levels from débutant to advanced) the following Monday. 

This was done single-handed, and was one of the happiest, most demanding, and rewarding periods of my life.

The only Roumanian I know is Happy Christmas.  I did once know the Roumanian for artichoke  -  but that has now vanished.

In addition to the classes, I was instantly approached by people wanting individual lessons.  Less entertaining  -  but more lucrative.  Ching ching.

If the OP has the guts and a bit of nous, there are great possibilities.  My only caveat is that she should remember that France is an absolutist, dirigiste, 'socialist' and interventionist State which is essentially opposed to enterprise.  Why not live in France and work somewhere where effort is appreciated ?



"M. Jérôme démasqua ses batteries: il resterait au lit."

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Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications

 pachapapa wrote:

 Judith wrote:
You might not need French to work as an English teacher, but you certainly need it to live here.....even in a big city.

The total knowledge of french by the majority of elderly UK expats could be put on the back of a postage stamp.Woot! [:-))]


Possibly true, but she is not an elderly ex-pat, and wants to work here..... hence my comment.

Judith
ex W1, via 47 and 11 and now [just] in 34, equidistant from Carcassonne, Narbonne and Béziers, where I hope we'll finally stay!!

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Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications

What I want to say to Gengulphus is this:

You can't put an old head on young shoulders!

You did marvellously well getting that course together over a weekend but, don't you think that, as you get older, you develop many coping strategies and can get many things done in much less time than when you were younger?Big Smile [:D]

It must be one of the compensations for getting old, you just have so much knowledge, life experience, whatever you want to call it that, working to a deadline, dealing with unexpected problems and all the rest of it, come that much easier.

We have so many tricks of the trade, as it were, to bring to bear on a problem and nothing seems that big or impossible, because you know that you can work through things.

The OP, if I have read her post rightly, is a youngster:  full of dreams and plans, as the young rightly should have.  She has to serve her apprenticeship in life.....and you can't replace gaining that experience first hand.

On the plus side, she hasn't had to deal with failures, dreams unfulfilled, desires quenched and so her perspective is different from ours.

If you do make the attempt, Emma Louise, please come back and tell us how you are doing and what you will have had to overcome, won't you?

I love to see young people getting on in life; that's what makes them so fascinating to know!


N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications

 sweet 17 wrote:
…but, don't you think that, as you get older, you develop many coping strategies and can get many things done in much less time than when you were younger?Big Smile [:D]

You put me in a difficult position S16, and I must admit I can't answer answer your question with complete candour because I haven't actually got older yet.  I am still in my prime, and I was even younger at the time referred to.  So my full battery of coping strategies remains as yet undetermined. 

I cannot tell how old the OP might be.  She must be quite young because she can still remember how many GCEs she has  -  so she is probably younger than I am.

But  -  age notwithstanding  -  I must admit quite shamelessly that I took up this challenge precisely because it was mad, ludicrous and unexpected.  I would not have done it had the proposition seemed remotely sensible. 

It was the middle of the night and I found myself careering across Ireland (right across) towards Galway with a totally unknown francophone Roumanian archbishop.  My coping strategies must at least been partially in place because the U-turn across a motorway verge did not disconcert me at all  -  the manœuvre was anyway very much of a piece with the style of Irish driving in general.  But my inability to convince the Roumanian driver that priorité à droite did not hold good in the Republic did give me cause for unease.

We stopped at a filling station and ate chocolate buns under the awning in the pouring rain. 

Given the general absurdity of the circumstances, oui seemed the obvious response.  I never regretted it.



"M. Jérôme démasqua ses batteries: il resterait au lit."

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Cool [8-|]

Re: Teaching English (CELTA) no previous experience/qualifications


Interesting to see how different peoples careers have developed. I fear that in this day and age it will not be as easy to get such  jobs as it was in the past. However, I'm sure some people will make it satisfying/big with enough entrepreneurial spirit (or cash) - please forgive my cynicism.

"It was the middle of the night and I found myself careering across Ireland (right across) towards Galway with a totally unknown francophone Roumanian archbishop." - if this were a novel I would be very tempted to skip to the end to see how this wonderful scenario came to be!! Surely not the average night out down the pub for the average person? Please tell more.

I suppose the path of life is full of unknown twists and turns - I was just giving my opinion to an obviously able person based on my particular path. I certainly benefited, compared to my peer group, by going to university and that was all those years ago. Nowadays all the peer group are going to university as well.

Richard.

NB its also interesting to see that the "normal/average" requirement for the CELTA is a degree, you pay for it and its over in a few weeks.
 

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