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Re: l'origine de l'expression

Well at least in English we can say we are "legless" !

Angela
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Re: l'origine de l'expression

 Loiseau wrote:
Well at least in English we can say we are "legless" ! Angela

We can say we are "armless" as well: that is, we don't cause no 'arm to nobody; what's wrong with that?


Sovereignty: the right to eat cholorinated chicken.
from The Little Book of Brexit Bo ll oc ks
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Re: l'origine de l'expression

 sweet 17 wrote:

Tied myself up in knots a bit last night when I was telling my neighbours about the new Governor of the Bank of England being a Canadian.  I wanted to use this latest expression in my repertoire.

Hier, j'en ai eu les bras qui en sont tombés....etc.

Is the first "en" correct in that expression?

I would have used j'en if I were saying that everyones arms were dropping off last night and mine were the first of them to do so.

However its only relatively recently that en has clicked with me and I have the confidence to exploit it, perhaps misplaced?


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Re: l'origine de l'expression

AFAIK, the really correct expression would be "J'ai eu les bras qui M'en sont tombés"  - I believe that the "m'en" refers to the cause, the initial reason  why my arms fell off. Something like "in this particular event,  my arms fell off".

I am not the best kind of French teacher there is, as my knowledge and interest in obscure grammatical rules have always quickly reached their limit. Maybe someone who is a bit more "à cheval sur les principes" of ultra-correct grammar can expand further.Big Smile [:D]


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Re: l'origine de l'expression

Well, the expression as written out for me, no less, is "en avoir les bras qui en tombent".

So, I just used that with which to make the passé composé.

As for grammar Woot! [:-))] ben, ç'est pas mon truc, hein!


Sovereignty: the right to eat cholorinated chicken.
from The Little Book of Brexit Bo ll oc ks
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Re: l'origine de l'expression

Very timely: I just heard Jean-Francois Copé on the news (those who are vaguely following the latest UMP psychodrama will know who he is) - he was of course, referring to his arch-rival Francois Fillon, who had done something or other, and he said about this very thing that Fillon had just done: "Les bras m'en sont un peu tombés"

So there you go. Politicians do use that expression.Devil [6]


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Re: l'origine de l'expression

 5-element wrote:

So there you go. Politicians do use that expression.Devil [6]

Thank you, 5-e.  I just KNEW it'd come in useful......Big Smile [:D]


Sovereignty: the right to eat cholorinated chicken.
from The Little Book of Brexit Bo ll oc ks
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Re: l'origine de l'expression

Sweet, I would never have taken you for the kind of person whose idea of fun is to impersonate Jean-François Copé.......eeeeeeeeeeekCry Out [:'(]


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