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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Mint, I use a fair bit of tge green parts, not keen on the thick parts of caulis, but freeze left-over bits like that and use them up in soups, either chopped small or liquidise the lot.

Our sons used to work on the University farm in the holidays, planting leeks - really small, skinny things and they planted field after field of them. They got aching backs and knees but liked the money!

That work helped to get our son his first job when he left school. He didn't want to go to university, so applied for jobs locally, one of which was at a company doing tests for the CE safety mark. His future boss had taken applications home, discussed her preferred candidates with her partner, who recognised his name and said he was a damn fine worker. He worked for that company for about 20 years, just left last week for a new post.


Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.


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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

 mint wrote:


Now that we are on this mind-boggling subject, can you tell me how much of the green bits you retain to eat?  I discard most of the green bits, only using the very delicate pale green bits near the stem.  My neighbour happened to be in my house once when I was doing this and she tut-tutted loudly and gathered up all the discarded bits to take home with her!  I didn't know where to look as I felt thoroughly shamed.


In our case, as much as possible! Only cut off and discard the outer bits and the very top bits where the leek is spreading.

Same goes for the thick stalks of cauliflowers and of broccoli.  I have done as some TV cooks suggested, that you peel them and use all of the stalk.  But I simply do not like the stalks so I continue to lop off all the large stalks and just eat the florets with only small bits of tender stalks.  In France, they do sell you such vegetables having trimmed them minimally and most of the stalks and soil are still on the veg; but I like that because I think this helps to prolong the veg's life.


Broccoli and Calabrese: we also adore the florets: and never ever overcook or stew green veggies like our granny and old Mum did! Stewed in Bicarb and my Gran also drank the "Green Water". Said it was good for you...

Probably, screwed up one's Sodium levels, a tad! She did live to nearly 90, though.

Try this, Minty: cut off the florets right at the stalk: steam the florets until al dente: cook the trimmed stalks in boiling water (rolling boil) until they are soft (prod with a skewer).

Young, fresh and well boiled then they are rather like poor man's asparagus

Plus all the calcium lives therein......

Big Smile [:D]

"Yes, but that apart, Mrs Lincoln, did you enjoy the play?"

Gluestick
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Locals here cook the leaves from celery. I tried it, but they were very bitter.
A little sprig in a bouquet garni is ok, as is a sprig from fennel.

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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

GG, thank you for the tip about freezing the stalks and cutting them up small and putting in soups. I think I will definitely try that with both caulis and broccolis.

Pat, I had a great tip from 5-e (I'm sure you remember her?) re celery leaves.  I tried cooking and eating them but, as you say, they are NOT good!Woot! [:-))]

She explained that the flavour is very strong and can't be use in big quantities.  So, the tip was to freeze them and only use a few leaves in veg soup where they do impart to the soup their special flavour.  I had a huge bunch of leaves once that lasted for months, used sparinglyBig Smile [:D]

I don't think the white celery is often sold with leaves but the green wants seem to have large, beautiful leaves attached and it IS a dreadful shame to throw all the leaves out.

Edit:  I mean, of course, the green ONES..............grrrr..............now having some difficulty remembering English words and often writing rubbish!!!

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Same with delicate herbs, Minty. Try this.

Wash and chop fine and freeze in water as ice cubes. Weird but really useful. When you want some, say fresh coriander for (e.g.) sprinkling on a curry, simply thaw the cubes; strain through a fine sieve and away you go. Mainly since one buys a bunch of fresh coriander and only uses a little; and chucks the rest.

We also save Swiss Chard stalks in the freezer; changes from red to dark black! Woot! [:-))] but when roasted, as we do, in a collage of veggies, yummy still!




"Yes, but that apart, Mrs Lincoln, did you enjoy the play?"

Gluestick
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

Alas, Gluey, can't seem to grow coriander successfully but I love the green leaves.  Have only the seeds for crushing and using in curries.

I am, in the next few minutes, sending you a PM.

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Re: Hooray! At Last!!

'' Locals here cook the leaves from celery. I tried it, but they were very bitter. ''

We use the celery leaves to make soup - delicious.
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