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Re: A recipe from 1905

LOL just the idea of lumps in bechamel is rather yuk!

To anyone who makes lumpy bechamel, sauces or gravies........ buy a bloody good fine gauge sieve (know what 'fine' means in this sense)  and use a soup ladle back to push it through.

Has it happened to me, well yes, many reasons why some lumps can occur, phone ringing, door going, moments inattention, but then you whisk a little see if they'll go that way........and then if not, sieve to get rid of them and no one is the wiser, nor should they beBig Smile [:D]

Incidentally when I cannot be bothered to use my mouli when I have made tomato sauce with fresh tomatoes, I push it through a fine sieve with the back of a soup ladle.  Bit of elbow grease, but works just fine.

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Re: A recipe from 1905

The original uses the word 'fine' for the bechamel sauce. I did wonder whether it had a special meaning I had not understood. But it surely just means good quality.
Personally I would buy the stuff.

I am very fond of my little mouli; it really gets stuff fine.
Ticking over, just about.
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Re: A recipe from 1905

So does anyone know what fine bechamel is?

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Re: A recipe from 1905

Could it be not too thick?
Ticking over, just about.
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Re: A recipe from 1905

I think that, as a soufflé base, the bechamel needs to be reasonably thick. So I would bet on it meaning "no lumps".
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Re: A recipe from 1905

Here is another recipe, in fact two.

I think that in the past goose was eaten more than today as it was often present in the basse cour as much for itself as for the eggs which are excellent, though you may have to find them. I guess that turkey and cheap chicken may have pushed goose to the sidelines.

These recipes are from an earlier century when cooks did not require that every step be given in great detail.

Comments welcome.

Goose confit and Consommé à l'oie (goose)

Confit
Start off by plucking and singing your goose, then place three or four sage leaves inside plus some salt. As the soup requires only the carcass and some skin, you can also prepare some excellent goose confit as well with the following recipe:
Roast the bird for an hour, if possible on a spit, otherwise on a grill in a deep dripping pan so that the fat is saved. Pour off the fat as necessary into a bowl. Only baste if the bird carcass seems to be drying out.
Now take the carcass out of the oven and carefully remove the wings and the legs so that only the carcass remains.
Put the fat from the bird into a cooking pot with some lard and boil for ten minutes.
Place the thighs in a stoneware pot next to each other Add salt and pepper and a laurel leaf on each piece of goose; do the same with the wings. Fill up the pot with the boiling fat and leave to rest for 12 hours. If you are using two or more geese, the meat can be layered but the top layer must be covered by a layer of fat of at least two to three centimetres.
Seal the pot with greaseproof paper, tie it down and store in a cold, dry place.

Soup
Brown off some finely chopped onions with a little goose fat in a pan. Place them in a large cooking pot and add the broken up goose carcass, the bones, the remains of the meat, a bouquet of parsley, a couple of branches of thyme, a small laurel leaf and, particularly, a sprig or two of sage. Cover with water and cook for a couple of hours at least (the original just says 'longtemps'). Instead of using water a good stock can be substituted. The pieces of goose will give it a richer flavour.
Now remove the carcass, and solid waste, pass the liquid through a fine sieve and add a quantity of tapioca. When serving, add to the soup the crushed and chopped goose liver, or some roughly chopped roast chestnuts.

Ticking over, just about.
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Re: A recipe from 1905

Tapioca? B-E-U-R-KKKKK !!
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Re: A recipe from 1905

I don't mind tapioca but I don't think I can eat a soup with goose in it.

I like a bit of roast goose but I couldn't have goose soup as it will be much too rich and er..........goosey tasting!

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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