French Education

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Re: violence in french schools

I like this one:
"Bonjour.
Les policiers et gendarmes n'ont rien à faire dans les écoles et lycées.
Ils ont assez de travail sur la voie publique et dans nos campagnes.
L'éducation Nationale a une solution.
Mettre deux grand " gaillards " devant leurs établissements.
Afin de surveiller et de faire respecter la discipline à l'entrée.
Casquettes enlevées.
Le bonjour de rigueur.
Pas d'écouteur dans les oreilles.
Tenues respectables.
Les téléphones se rangeront dans une armoire de sécurité.
Et si ces consignes ne sont pas respectées, une exclusion d'une semaine sera prononcée.
Non mais !!!."
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Re: violence in french schools

I am talking of experience. In my days, we feared our teachers (well some of them) not because they belted or caned us (that was not allowed in our schools/colleges) but because they wouldn't accept any non-sense coming from us. Of course, some idiots were regularly called in the Director's office, one even hit a male teacher one day but that was dealt with promptly (expulsion of the College for the fighter).
This teacher respect takes many many years to put in place and a couple of generations' experience has been lost by a government/parent attitude. Governments don't put any measure to enforce discipline and parents are far too protective or simply not caring of what happens to their little darlings.
In my days, you had the "Service Militaire" which in itself, was a period of discipline in group and (pardon my french...) no c@@p accepted. After 12 months' service, you generally left with a sense of respect for the others and a somewhat different look in life. This was then passed on to your children (to a few exceptions) and the system carried-on taking care of itself.

That idiot of a kid feared his father for being reported as missing from that course, let's hope he remembers which side of his face is hurting the most now.
Les voyages forment la jeunesse
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Re: violence in french schools

Thanks for your input Eric - interesting about military service. How old were you when you did this?
And ALBF - your post about family problems. The UK isn't any different, that's why I said at the start that school problems in both countries are similar.
If it was possible, I would reduce the school leaving age to 15. But there aren't the jobs available now that there used to be.
Those last few years at school must seem pointless to many teens.  Those who aren't suited to an academic curriculum.They want to be out there earning money, trying to be independent.

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Re: violence in french schools

I have no idea about the UK Patf.

But I still make the point that 'French life', 'employment' and the cost of living in France puts too much of a burden on family life.

Hence, couples with children split up and some children become a problem at school as a consequence.

It is not the children's fault. Stop blaming the children.
ner ner nee ner ner!!
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Re: violence in french schools

 Patf wrote:
  ................ If it was possible, I would reduce the school leaving age to 15. But there aren't the jobs available now that there used to be. ................

When I was at school in rural Essex, the leaving age was 15, but a blind eye was turned to boys who left earlier; many were expected to work on farms, and their families needed the extra income. There was also plenty of work available for them.

Those I know who did so, in the main, were quite happy, as they had never been led to expect anything else, were pleased to get away from school, were respected in the work they did, and had at least some opportunities for promotion. I don't recall unemployment benefit being a choice after school.


"Many of the age raisings in the 19th and 20th centuries were aimed at generating more skilled labour by providing additional time for students to gain additional skills and qualifications. In recent years, government statistics showed that 11% of 16 to 18 year-olds were neither continuing their education after completion of their GCSEs, nor in full-time employment or an apprenticeship, thus increasing the overall unemployment rate given many are unable to find work. The British government hoped that by making education compulsory up to the age of 17 by 2013 and 18 by 2015, it could change this."




On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H. L. Mencken 1880 - 1956

Some may not like his views, but what a prediction!
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Re: violence in french schools

Continued from the above, as the last paragraphs were distorted.

Unfortunately, no-one seems to have thought about where jobs were going to come from, nor to have done anything about it.

So now, the UK has considerable unemployment, especially if one adds in those working part time or on casual (zero-hour) contracts, and has to rely on unskilled immigrants to do the jobs which are below the qualifications of Brits.

Apparently it's OK for immigrants to be uneducated, but not for Brits. But what happens to their offspring? Are they to be educated only to a minimum to allow them to fill their parents' jobs, or does the UK require a constant supply of relatively uneducated immigrants?

On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H. L. Mencken 1880 - 1956

Some may not like his views, but what a prediction!
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Re: violence in french schools

I'll try again

So now, the UK has considerable unemployment, especially if one adds in those working part time or on casual (zero-hour) contracts, and has to rely on unskilled immigrants to do the jobs which are below the qualifications of Brits.

 

Apparently it's OK for immigrants to be uneducated, but not for Brits. But what happens to their offspring? Are they to be Unfortunately, no-one seems to have thought about where jobs were going to come from, nor to have done anything about it.

educated only to a minimum to allow them to fill their parents' jobs, or does the UK require a constant supply of relatively uneducated immigrants?

Normal 0

On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H. L. Mencken 1880 - 1956

Some may not like his views, but what a prediction!
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Re: violence in french schools

Well, I can't read that, but (literally) reading between the lines...
I wouldn't assume that people from other countries doing unskilled jobs are unskilled people. They most certainly are not.
In fact, over the time I worked with immigrants learning English, I've met mainly professionals with degrees or other professional qualifications in everything from architecture, veterinary medicine, graphic design, epidemiology, specialist nursing....,,
The fact that a majority come to the UK and work as baristas or hotel cleaners or waiting staff has nothing to do with a lack of skills. It's more attributable to having a decent work ethic and a desire to make the best of things and earn a living,
Pity the work shy Brits who seem to prefer unemployment to any form of work don't learn a thing or two from their example.

And...just saying....we don't seem to have an unemployment problem at the moment. Whether one believes the stats are massaged or not, there are lots of jobs and not enough folk to fill them. That's perticularly true of the NHS at the moment, but we have Brexit to thank for most of that...
Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
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