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Re: Being poorly

Thank you Hoddy ! 

You must have grown up in a really cold region.  Can't imagine.

Nothing nicer than a warm, comfy home on a cold night.



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Re: Being poorly

Ice on both side of the windows in Yorkshire most winters too, three boys in the one room. Cracking the bed sheets off the drying line in the backyard to fold them, frozen solid. Only one fire lit in the house, drying your hair kneeling front of it if you could get past the steaming clothes horse full of clothes drying/melting.

Poorly, but if you were really ill, "proper poorly" usually reserved for something serious, the only time I remember seeing the bedroom fire lit was when my father was ill in bed with jaundice. Remember that yellow face peering out. He was judged to be "proper poorly".
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Re: Being poorly

Memories flood back reading some of these posts.

The one fire, the clothes horse being round the fire for days on end so you couldn’t even see it for the washing. If you could get near the fire, only one side of you could be toasted at once.


Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.


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Re: Being poorly

Hope everyone is getting over their poorliness.
This thread has really taken me back to childhood. Yes, the frozen windows - I remember warming a penny up between my hands and putting it on the window to make a peephole. A long time since I've heard liberty bodices mentioned too. And to stave off poorliness, a large spoonful of malt and codliver oil every morning ("toffee on a spoon" my mam would call it in an attempt to make it sound more palatable). And of course every time I went to my nana's out would come the syrup of figs, she was obsessed with the whole family's bowel activity. No Friars Balsam, but Vic's Vapour Rub in abundance. At school when I was in Reception Class (it was called 'the babies class' then) there was a big open coal fire with a metal fireguard round it (whatever would Health and Safety think?) and we all used to put our gloves/ mittens on the fireguard to dry out and warm up before we went home. Of course, as someone mentioned earlier, a day off school was unthinkable, acceptable only in the event of bubonic plague.
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Re: Being poorly

talking about school - remember the small bottles of milk we were all given at mid-morning? In winter they were frozen solid and put to thaw on the radiators.
They did try to keep us healthy.
Can anyone remember who was the comic radio character who used to say "I'm proper poorly!"


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Re: Being poorly

I have similar memories. The heavy ex army issue coat on the bed. I used to be a milk monitor at school and myself and a pal used to carry the crates of milk in with the foil top pushed out of the top of the bottle by the frozen milk. Another memory is corned beef legs!
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Re: Being poorly

Corned beef legs? Unless it was the red, blotchy state legs got into by being too close to the fire if you possibly could get close, that is.

Yes, the frozen milk up sticking up from the bottle! Delicious in winter, could be disgusting in the summer, when it was warm and sometimes went off.

I was ink monitor from about age 6, had to spoon the ink powder out of the big ink powder tin into a jug and add water carefully, stirring gently until it was mixed properly.

The ink then had to be carefully transferred from the jug into the ink can, which had a long, thin spout for pouring into the little hole in the top of the ink wells.

It was a very tricky job as both the ink powder and the ink itself could make a big mess. It was a job only a couple of us were trusted with, brilliant being able to go into the warm school early out of the cold or wet, but it didn’t feel such a privilege in sunny summer weather.


Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.


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Re: Being poorly

I loved cod liver oil and malt and I was a milk monitor mostly because loved milk and was happy to drink up all the share of those who, quite inexplicably, didn’t like it. To be fair we could sometimes tell what the cows had been eating. Kale flavoured milk might become trendy these days. I thought for years that my good teeth were the result of the milk drinking until a dentist told me that he thought that the well-water I had grown up with had naturally occurring flouride.
My dour mother thought that corned beef legs were the result of idleness; sitting in front of the fire when you should be working.
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