French Language

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Re: Another French test

 Chancer wrote:
I did notice that amongst the accents in the toolbar, which were really to small for me to actually see there was an à but with the accent sloping the other way, does this exist? If so when do you use it?

It doesn't exist in French but I suppose the toolbar is designed to be useful in other languages which do use it (e.g. Spanish).

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Re: Another French test

 NormanH wrote:

But without going into phonetics there is no really accurate way of representing sounds. I was just trying to show that the accents in French are there to show the sounds, not just something decorative. Once you feel that they become essential.

The International Phonetic Alphabet works perfectly well but I have not been able to find it in a programme that I could use on here.

When I work with the OH on his pronunciation, I tell him to make è sound like there

To my chagrin, when I was on the Camino, the French people, whilst telling me I spoke very good French, did also point out that I spoke it with an English accent.  When I told them, no, it was a Charentais accent, they just laughed their heads off!

Edit:  And Chance was right, they did ask for "Futur" so that should have alerted you to the fact that you should use just one word and not two to express futur proche


Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Re: Another French test

So it is a piege for English speaking Spaniards who want to do a French test then!

Or perhaps simply an universal toolbar.


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Re: Another French test

 NormanH wrote:

the ay in bay is a diphthong with two sounds not just one...

In England, yes.  There aren't so many diphthongs in Scotland; the Scots (most of them, anyway) pronounce "bay" very much like , which gives them an advantage in France. 

They have a similar advantage with the "o" sound; "low" in Scotland sounds about the same as l'eau.  

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Re: Another French test

I just did the English test which confirmed my worst fears about my abysmal education (the progressive English teachers smoked dope in front of the class) as I only scored 71.7. Mainly due to not having a clue what the English grammatical terms or tenses were, it still is my stumbling block in learning French.

My comprehensive school was so big and spread between two buildings half a mile apart that most of the teachers did not know each other, I vividly remember the French teacher talking about verbs, it was the first time we had ever heard of them, not that she believed us she just thought we were playing up, our French learning pretty much stalled at that point as I we had  no clue what she was talking about.

As for the English lessons we weren't even taught to spell let alone have our mistakes corrected, a real shame as my elder sisters both had a really good grammar school education, I passed the 11+ but it made no difference due to the politics of the day.

All of which makes me especially proud to have got 62 (I still reckon it should have been 80 Smile [:)]) in the French test.


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Re: Another French test

So that's the difference - as I come from near Scotland my vowels are like those in France.
There was also an interesting Geordie gutteral "r" which is heard in the local accent here (Gers.)

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Re: Another French test

Referring to Allanb's post:
So that's the difference - as I come from near Scotland my vowels are like those in France.
There was also an interesting Geordie gutteral "r" which is heard in the local accent here (Gers.)

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Re: Another French test

 sweet 17 wrote:

 NormanH wrote:

But without going into phonetics there is no really accurate way of representing sounds. I was just trying to show that the accents in French are there to show the sounds, not just something decorative. Once you feel that they become essential.

The International Phonetic Alphabet works perfectly well but I have not been able to find it in a programme that I could use on here.

When I work with the OH on his pronunciation, I tell him to make è sound like there

To my chagrin, when I was on the Camino, the French people, whilst telling me I spoke very good French, did also point out that I spoke it with an English accent.  When I told them, no, it was a Charentais accent, they just laughed their heads off!

Edit:  And Chance was right, they did ask for "Futur" so that should have alerted you to the fact that you should use just one word and not two to express futur proche



I think that there and bear rhyme too, so we agree on that one...

They didn't actually specify the futur, but the version in the active voice was in the futur so technically the passive version should be also. But you see that's what I hate about these things. They don't allow the variations which are perfectly ok in normal usage, and insist instead on trying to trip people up, thereby giving the impression that 'teacher always knows best'...a sort of power game.   I don't think I have noticed people making a big distinction between futur and the compound future with aller, what ever the books say..

It put me off languages at school, and although I would have got in the 90s on this test, these little things rankle


The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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