French Language

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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

 audio wrote:

 5-element wrote:
It's close, but I would argue that tyranniser still does not translate bullying exactly.

 

Nevertheless, it's closer than what you came up with your earlier post.

Mais oui Audio, tu prouves que tu es plus fort que moi.Big Smile [:D]


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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

I have had this debate before in another context; my feelings are that Belgium (Wallonia) is a 'blame society' where the ideal is to transfer blame for anything to others and by the same token to avoid it oneself, because that implies a weakness and enables others to heap you with approbrium and to carry the can. Unlike Chinese society, where the idea is not to lose face or to make others do so.

This permits lying and dishonesty.

My take on French society, and the fact that there are no real terms for bullying is that it too is a blame society and that bullying is a standard and accepted part of culture, and not judged in the same way as in Anglo-Saxon cultures. Thus, employers bully their employees, administrations bully their clients and shops bully their customers, in every case the aim being to deny responsibility as this implies a wrong, which, in a heavily top down society cannot be admitted as it shows a faille which cannot exist. In other words, the State is believed to be perfect or perfectible.

The corollary of this is a sacrifice of individuality, as to be successful one has to belong to something official, whether it be party or association, and to be outside is to be present the potential to be a victim as there is no protection from society.

And lying is very common in France!Devil [6]


Too thick for a PhD!
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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

Spot-on analysis, Wooly!
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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

Kiss [kiss]
Too thick for a PhD!
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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

Perhaps someone can help me with a phrase that I have forgotten, it was said by a woman who had lived in France for a very long time, when the subject of manners was being discussed. We were discussing how there is a strict code engrained from a very young age, the bisouing, using vous and tu at the right times etc but that on other occasions there is what many anglo saxons would consider to be rude, eg the opening of a checkout at the supermarket and it is each man for themselves, waiting for someone to pass by in a narrow shopping aisle or country lane and there is no acknowledgement from them, or at a 4 way stop sign, there is an eagerness to be the first away without thought to who should be the first to pull away. The woman used an expression that I hadn't heard of at that time and she explained in english that it is part of the french psyche, to be first, more important, not to yield and that whilst such behaviours may appear rude to us, they don't to the French*. It wasn't said in a derogatory manner ( she was married to a french man ) and the word arrogance was ruled out when I was trying to understand her meaning. Is there a french phrase or idiom that encapsulates the attitude she described?
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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

Chacun pour soi?

Ne pas se laisser marcher sur les pieds?

 


Animal Aid Saint Aubin

"Saving the life of one animal may not change the world, but the world will surely change for that one animal"

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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

Spot on Woolybanana.

My French pal who is well aware of the differnces between the UK service culture and the French lack of it is actually treated with the same disdain by the commerciants around here as I am despite him being having a totally disarming charm, being a terrific negotiator and  a fidéle client of many years who spends loads of money with them, he is always at pains to point out that it isnt just me or that I am an immigrant, everyone is treated equally (badly) around here.

He says that the moment you enter a shop or business here in Picardie there is a presumption of guilt on your part and you are treated as if you have gone in with the sole purpose of ****ing them over.


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Re: How does one translate 'bully'into French?

Christine has got it. In a similar vein, there is also "Il ne faut pas se laisser faire!"

Or, "Faut pas s'laisser faire!"


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