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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

à boire, uriner en public

 

Thankyou for the chuckle NH. As if french men wouldn't do thatDevil [6]


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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

Yes. I didn't understand why the 's' was at the end of 'ridicules', as I thought the word was 'un short'..

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

 Gardian wrote:

We British aren't all that great though, are we?...

Reims - Reems...

.............. but at least Marseille usually comes out more or less right these days, rather than the old Mar-sails. 




But some cities of historical significance to us have been given official English names for centuries, haven't they? 
Rheims (reems) for the French Reims
Paris (parr-iss) for the French capital
Marseilles and Lyons with S on the end (I am never quite sure how that affects pronounciation.

And how many of us would talk about Firenze, Venezia or Roma in the course of an English conversation, rather than Florence, Venice and Rome?

Angela

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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

Reims, but the french calling it rance, never seems quite right, even though I know it is right.

 

 And I know french people with the surname Paris and they are called pa riss, and not pa ri, so what is that about then, I've never got that.


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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

 Rabbie wrote:
 Hoddy wrote:
Don't take it to heart, Frenchie. You should hear Americans attempt Leicester and Loughborough. Hoddy
Or English people tryng to pronounce Kirkcudbright (a town in SW Scotland pronounced as Kircoobree

.... or Brits, French, Germans or any other nationalities you care to mention, except the Welsh  pronounce Machynlleth  ... You try it!

The French will say 'machin lette'.  Brits will have a variation on 'mack in elieth' or 'muck an let' (my favoriteBig Smile [:D] and very apt for being a little farming town) or 'mar ink elieth' or 'marink keny lieth'. Germans have not yet progressed beyond the 'v' of village not pronounced as a 'w'. They'll insist on going to the weelage ... It's a town ! of 3000 souls including all the farmsteads in the surrounding hills ...

Marr rann tleth ...

 

 


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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

Yes of course we will all have difficulties regardless of our nationality especially when presented with something in the written form, I am not sure why Frenchie thought my posting was unfair.

And then of course there are English cities that have got their own names in the French language, Londres, Douvres, etc and I am happy to use these when speaking French, what I dont want to do is deliberately pi55pronounce all the English other place names and especially the English christian names and I just dont understand why newsreaders and reporters whom I know speak perfect unaccented English feel the need to do so for the viewing public, all they are doing is encouraging the practice.

I watched the French dubbed version of "Gypsy Wedding" (not the original title I suspect), they kept talking about the town of Epsonne, OK I am used to that but at one point they had a sub-title for something that was written, it may have been the registry office sign, the sub-title was Epson

As for the christian name thing I just find it downright disrespectfull, I dont know anyone in England that when a foreign person is introduced to them in person does not try their hardest to correctly pronounce their given name, OK some do a better job than others and Jean-Paul (Pol) may hear his name pronounced John-Paul but in general I believe the will is there.

When i was young a Spanish guy joinde our group of friends, he was introduced to me as "Haython" which I did find hard to pronounce, i asked him how it was spelled and he said H-A-Y-C-O-N which of course threw me but I persisted and didnt cop out and shout out HEY CON! when I wanted to attract his attention Devil [6]

 


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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

 Chancer wrote:

As for the christian name thing I just find it downright disrespectfull, I dont know anyone in England that when a foreign person is introduced to them in person does not try their hardest to correctly pronounce their given name,

Hm.  I always introduce myself as Deborah and then people call me Debbie, even though I detest that diminutive.  So maybe it's just non-Brits who get the respect!


"I couldn't sleep very well last night. Some noisy b*ggers going around in automobiles kept me awake." Ken Miles
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Re: French prononciation of English names and places

Come to that there are plenty of English place names which English people pronounce incorrectly. Near here there is a village called Zouch which is pronounced Zoch. You can't blame anyone for getting it wrong because Ashby de la Zouch, also nearby, is pronounced as you would expect it to be.

Hoddy
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