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Re: A recipe from 1905

Wooly - I won't be trying your chicken liver recipe because I don't like raw liver!
We have some in the freezer.
I fry or grill them, then mince and mix with fried onions, chicken fat and hard boiled eggs.  To make a paté.
As for the goose - I know goose and duck fat is supposed to be healthy, but not in big quantities. Don't fancy it.
ps I bought a very large mackerel after your first recipe, it was very fresh and very tasty! Filleted and fried.

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Re: A recipe from 1905

These recipes do seem a bit odd at times. There is no indication in the recipe that the livers had been pre-cooked, but I assume that they would cook in the hot soup.
I think that it is all a question of quantity for the fat. When the legs were reheated it would melt off.
But these do give us an insight as to how food was prepared and eaten over 100 years ago.
Ticking over, just about.
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Re: A recipe from 1905

Here is another recipe suited to this day when the thermometer is hovering around zero:

Cream of Cucumber Soup
To start with, prepare a good broth with a veal shank, all the poultry giblets that you have, the usual vegetables and a quantity of water adapted to the number of guests.
Carefully remove any foam from the surface as well as surface fat and pass through a fine damp cloth. Next, choose three large cucumbers for about three litres of broth. Cut them in two lengthwise, remove the seeds and cut them into pieces. Now fry them gently in butter and season with salt and pepper. Add five or six spoons of the broth or even a bechamel if you prefer.
Reduce a little whilst stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, then pass through a fine sieve. Put this in a saucepan on the stove and dilute slowly with the broth, still stirring continuously, then add a measure of small green peas. Now let it simmer on a low heat. When ready to serve, skim scum and fat from the surface, thicken with three or four egg yolks beaten in half a litre of light cream and some butter Pour into the tureen and serve very hot.

Ticking over, just about.
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Re: A recipe from 1905

Raw cucumber no longer agrees with this olde gal, even though I like it, but I can eat it cooked, so this recipe has inspired me for next time I do a broth and have some cucumber in. But for all I cook a lot, I am a lazy cook too, and this seems like toooo much work for me.

Big Smile [:D] and saying that, on this miserable day, I have just baked, baguettes, loaves, buns, teacakes with raisins and walnut cakes. But all easy prep. And for some that would not look lazy, but really it was quick and easy for me to do the mixes, just the bread that literally took hours and hours to
rise as I never use much yeast and let the breads rise in their own sweet time.

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Re: A recipe from 1905

Whilst waiting for the rugby and avoiding housework, here is another recipe from the same menu as the previous one:

Grilled sea bream (fr = dorade) with a langoustine coulis
The dorade is a very delicate fish that does not keep well so must be eaten very fresh. The new means of refrigeration means that this fish can be obtained in Paris

Choose medium sized fish, scale,empty and wash it with plenty of water, dry off with a cloth, slash either side but not too deep, salt with fine salt and cover all over with plenty of olive oil.

Place under (or on) a moderate grill turning regularly until golden brown. Serve them on a piping hot serving plate with the langoustine coulis or, a tomato sauce.

To make the coulis

Cook about 30 langoustines in salted boiling water. Remove the tails (Peel them is you wish) and crush the remains in a mortar with a few blanched almonds.
In a pan with a good sized piece of butter, put half a pound of veal steak, a slice of ham a carrot and a parsnip. When everything has browned, sprinkle with flower, turning with a wooden spoon. Cover with some stock, add salt and pepper, an onion with cloves stuck in it, a bouquet garni and some finely sliced mushrooms. Leave to simmer for a long time, put through a fine colander, then mix in the langoustine puree.
Pass through a fine cloth.
Pour the sauce over the fish and garnish with the langoustines

Ticking over, just about.
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Re: A recipe from 1905

Is this a french recipe????
I make bisque and make that bisque into a thicker sauce to go with fish, but have never used a meat stock in it. I cannot help wonder why, or what difference it would make.



I cannot get veal, years ago, friends of friends in North Yorkshire used to be veal farmers, the meat all for export.I have never seen it in the shops here and it is one thing I haven't missed.



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Re: A recipe from 1905

No idea, Doudoune seems odd but there we are.

Ticking over, just about.
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Re: A recipe from 1905

I found that french friends in general did not like 'surf and turf', I tried with them, but it was not really to their taste. That was why I asked.

Still, I love oyster sauce with meats when I cook chinese style food, so I would probably like it. And fish has been used as flavouring with meat for a long time, after all the romans used it all the time.



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