French Language

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Re: french/english idioms

That's a good one Mint - so close.
Richard - "F u c k you" seems to get a good response too."
I know, it was printed on the dusty windscreen  of an abandoned car next to our first house.
Why do you think they sometimes resort to english?

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Re: french/english idioms

If you look at the timing of the comment you will see that it was in response to a rather silly youtube thing posted to defend anybody critisising Trump on a thread. Every other word was that.

I am not aware of french people saying such a phrase and please dont think it originated from me on this forum.

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Re: french/english idioms

Ah the F word, used a lot by, well, young french people. Part of their language. I am not always sure that they realise the significance of it being said, but said it is.

I always find that the french swear a lot.

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Re: french/english idioms

It's not an idiom but it kind of follows on from idun's post, about English words becoming part of the French language.
By coincidence I've recently come across this "import" in two totally unrelated books that I've read, the first time it seemed so horrible I couldn't quite believe I'd read it, and the second time I started thinking Good grief is this actually becoming common usage. The word is "bodybuildé", to describe a muscular chap - has anyone else come across it?
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Re: french/english idioms

<BLOCKQUOTE><table width="85%"><tr><td class="txt4"><img src="/forums/completefrance-forums/cs/Themes/default/images/icon-quote.gif">&nbsp;<strong>idun wrote:</strong></td></tr><tr><td class="quoteTable"><table width="100%"><tr><td width="100%" valign="top" class="txt4"><div>Ah the F word, used a lot by, well, young french people. Part of their language. I am not always sure that they realise the significance of it being said, but said it is. <br></div><div><br></div><div>I always find that the french swear a lot.<br></div></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></BLOCKQUOTE>

I was told but two different Germans at different times that they prefer to swear in English because they can be far more expressive than in their own language. It probably helps that they know that the majority of the people who overhear their outbursts won’t have a Fokine clue what they’re saying so therefore won’t take offence.
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Re: french/english idioms

I'm sure I've told you this before but as we are on a swearing theme...
An elderly friend here was pleased when her granddaughter became engaged to an English guy. Well, pleased except he was vegetarian....
Anyway, at dinner one evening, she made us all laugh with takes of how they'd been making efforts to learn each others' languages.
Apparently, granddaughter was preparing dinner one evening when she dropped something on the kitchen floor and let rip with the usual chain of French expletives.
Her fiancé, anxious to continue his learning, asked her shortly afterwards if she could translate what she'd said. Only what he thought he'd heard was "Lutin au bord de la mer"😂😂😂😂😂
Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
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Re: french/english idioms

ROFL, Betty!
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Re: french/english idioms

<BLOCKQUOTE><table width="85%"><tr><td class="txt4"><img src="/forums/completefrance-forums/cs/Themes/default/images/icon-quote.gif">&nbsp;<strong>EuroTrash wrote:</strong></td></tr><tr><td class="quoteTable"><table width="100%"><tr><td width="100%" valign="top" class="txt4">It's not an idiom but it kind of follows on from idun's post, about English words becoming part of the French language.
By coincidence I've recently come across this "import" in two totally unrelated books that I've read, the first time it seemed so horrible I couldn't quite believe I'd read it, and the second time I started thinking Good grief is this actually becoming common usage. The word is "bodybuildé", to describe a muscular chap - has anyone else come across it?</td></tr></table></td></tr></table></BLOCKQUOTE> Yes, it appears in a Daniel Pennac book. But then every other word in his books is slang (or bastardised English). The first one I read involved paperback in one hand, dico in the other :-)
Be alert!! Your country needs lerts.....
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