French Language

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Re: I can't answer this question....

Then there are words like temperate, temperature, from a latin root:
https://www.etymonline.com/word/temperate
One explanation on there which relates to time is 'regulated'.
Language is fascinating, but imo you can never get an exact equivalent when translating one language to another. So many other cultural influences. Let alone grammar rules.

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Re: I can't answer this question....

Sorry for asking on this post, but Hoddy, is your clafoutis 'light and airy' and not stodgy, because I have yet to have one that was not.

And if it is light and airy, could I please have the recipe. thankyou

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Re: I can't answer this question....

It wasn't stodgy Idun, but it was more what we would call 'clarty' around these parts than I would have liked.
I've been wondering about experimenting with a yorkshire pudding recipe - I make a good toad in-the-hole. Do you think it might work ?

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Re: I can't answer this question....

Not sure, Hoddy.  I think the weight of the cherries or whatever fruit you might use, could be too heavy to be supported by a yorkshire pudding recipe.

Maybe, the batter needs to be "heavy".  I am not good with batter generally and I leave it well alone though I do make pancakes now and again.  Even then I have never managed pancakes the way my French friends make them.  Mine are heavier altogether and I can guess that you might call them a bit clarty!Smile [:)]

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Re: I can't answer this question....

  YCCMB wrote:
Good example, mint. Here's a link I don't know if you have come across, but it's name reminds me of you so much that I feel you really need it in your life if it's not already there. Sorry it won't be clickable. Leflepourlescurieux.fr

Betty, I have noted your presence on the forum todaySmile [:)]

And I so want you to know that I am greatly enjoying lfplc!  Only a day or two ago, I had my questions on French adverbs answered.....happy!!

I now know why some adverbs use the masculine form of the adjective (no need to change the word to the feminine form first) + ent.

Even more interesting, and importantly, I now understand when to use -amment and when it should be  -emment.

In my, some would say sad little life (NOT at all accurate, btw), these things have bothered me for a long time and now, at a stroke as it were, they have been clarified!

Thank you once again Kiss [kiss]

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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Re: I can't answer this question....

I have a recipe for a far breton that is not heavy and sometimes wonder if cherries would go in it, or their water content would affect it.

I make what my mother called a drop pudding at this time of year.

Yorkshire pud mix, poured into hot lard by preference and then any soft fruit without a stone in the middle Whistles [Www] dropped into the baking tin and baked in a hot oven.

I never use too much yorkshire pud mix in this, just coat the base. I love these, and serve with a little sprinkling of sugar and some whipped cream.

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Re: I can't answer this question....

Id, please give us the proportions for your yorkshire pud mix and can you suggest another fat than lard?

Can't use lard because of OH but I bet he'd like one of these puddings using figs as the figs are just beginning to ripen.

Apprendre une langue, c'est faire un voyage différent chaque jour.
from Fle pour les curieux
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