French Education

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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

 mint wrote:
Oh, I forgot to mention those Place in the Sun type programmes with their presenters who are all teeth and t@ts (and, no, I am not letting down the side).

I like to watch the ones when they go to France because I think it's one way that I can "visit" different parts of France.

There is one, all blue-eyed, TnT (as described above), who glosses over all the French place names at speed and it often takes me several minutes to work out where she has taken the househunters.  I have to rely on visual clues, direction boards, landscape, etc and make a guess and hope they show a map of France so that I can get a rough idea.

Only a week ago, she was in Colly-or (sometimes she said Colly-er)!  Still, if I told you that she was in southern France, it all becomes clearBig Smile [:D]



Jasmine Harman speaks Portuguese, Spanish, Italian and some Greek (her mother is Greek), although she does admit her French is "not so good".

I imagine many others are also just as jealous of her teeth and t@ts, so don't worry too much about it Big Smile [:D]

Spanish is a second language for our son, but this seems to make French pronunciation difficult for him, although he speaks it well enough otherwise, as well as adequate Swedish and Danish. His English spelling is atrocious, though.


On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H. L. Mencken 1880 - 1956

Some may not like his views, but what a prediction!
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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

To go back to the pronunciation of names of cities, on the previous page, surely if a UK newsreader or presenter used the French "Paree" or "Rinnce" - cities for which historically we have developed accepted pronunciation (and sometimes spellings) in English - the average UK listener would not have a clue what these places were. Ditto if a story were to involve Florence, Venice, Brussels or even Swansea; would we expect the newsreader to use "Firenze", "Venezia", "Bruxelles" or "Abertawe"?
The French have their own names/spellings for many of our cities, as Chancer has said. "Edimbourg and "Cantorbury" as well as "Douvres" and "Londres". Their newsreaders would certainly never use "English" pronunciation for stories involving those, and why should they?

Angela
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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

I was looking for, but unable to find, a clip of the brilliant Pamela Stephenson parody from Not the Nine O'clock News where she impersonates, I think, Moira Stuart pronouncing weird place names. It's true that, back in the day, when there was considerable unrest in various African countries, and indeed elsewhere across the globe, it was a source of great hilarity to hear a mixture of diluted RP alongside the incongruity of correctly pronounced foreign names.

ETA: I will long remember catching a brief snippet of one of the many "interior design" programmes on TV , where the "designer" was using a lovely Toile de Jouy fabric for something, and, for us plebs, took the time to advise that it was thus named because it came from the town of Toile......
Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard.
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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

 nomoss wrote:



Jasmine Harman speaks Portuguese, Spanish, Italian and some Greek (her mother is Greek), although she does admit her French is "not so good".

I imagine many others are also just as jealous of her teeth and t@ts, so don't worry too much about it Big Smile [:D]

Spanish is a second language for our son, but this seems to make French pronunciation difficult for him, although he speaks it well enough otherwise, as well as adequate Swedish and Danish. His English spelling is atrocious, though.



Actually, it wasn't Jasmine Harman on that programme.  It was the other blonde TnT ladyBig Smile [:D]

We have had native Spanish speakers in our French class and, yes, they do find French sounds difficult.  I have taught Spanish students and they tried, without success, to teach me to say Zaragoza and aqua (as in water).  I think Spanish is devilishly difficult to pronounce.

Back to place names; I don't think I said anything about place names in my original post.  It was more names of books, music, phrases etc that form part of the quizz or correct answers or objects that the presenters had to say.

Place names are notoriously difficult, even in England and I don't need to give examples though I WILL name just one.  When I was working near Bath, there was a place nearby spelt Collerne.  We, ousiders, would say it as it appears, with the stress on the second syllable.  The locals, however, said something like CULLerne, with the stress on the first syllable.  So there we go........

I myself have to admit to not much liking RP as it always sounds affected and insincere to me;  possibly because in former times, most politicians and "people in authority" generally spoke RP.

And, Betty, how I laughed at your last post............what a gem!

N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

In spite of my old french village being a great distance from the spannish border, quite a few of my friends make fairly regular trips and assure me that spannish is easy for the french. Strangely, on the only occasion I have been to Spain, no one could understand my awful efforts at spannish, but they could understand the odd word of italian I know.

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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

 You can call me Betty wrote:
Well, it appears that Huw Edwards has read this thread...if his very good pronunciation of "Charlie Hebdo" and " Place de la République" are anything to go by.
§
Can't say I noticed the pronunciation, which means it was Ok and not "Anglicised" French, but I did notice his professional presentation which tells more of the training he has had plus his years of experience, and that's nowt to do with  his nationality!

I did hear Churchill pronounced à la française once, and it took me the best part of the item to realise who they were speaking off ... there are times when the original pronunciation should be stuck to, even if it is neither natural to the speaker or the norm ... it is quite well enough known in its original pronunciation to be used. London is another in spite of what most French people might believe, they'd know what was meant.



Judith
ex W1, via 47 and 11 and now [just] in 34, equidistant from Carcassonne, Narbonne and Béziers, where I hope we'll finally stay!!

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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

 NormanH wrote:
I hear Rannnse...


That's how I hear it and pronounce it, Norman, with a good rolling rrrrr to start. No wonder all those years ago when I asked somebody in a service station how to find the road to Reems in pre-motorway days; not until I went for the map to show did he laugh and then tell us how to find the road.

Place names near us that non-French people have problems with are Alès and Uzès; they both have the 's' pronounced, but they are often pronounced as Al (as in pal) and Use.



Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.


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Re: French as she is spoken in the UK

There is one  French village name that I am happt to pi55pronounce with RP, in fact I rejoice in doing so very clearly and with the stress à la anglais.

http://www.ville-pissy.fr/article.do&id=1745

In fact I have even persuaded a few of them to call it Pissy village instead of village de Pissy when in my company, if you stick rigidly to incorrect foreigner French eventually the kindest people will begin to communicate to you in the same way.

I am really looking forward to the day that I iget to ntroduce an inhabitant of Pissy to an English person and ask them to say where they live Devil [6]


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