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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

 Loiseau wrote:
So I suppose "meeting up again" would be our equivalent, though that sounds rather more cumbersome in English than in French.


reunion?
As in:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Family_Reunion

The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
- Bertrand Russell
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

I think a reunion in English has overtones of being organised, rather than happenstance, Norman.

Angela
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

Tough if people think this thread is "past its sell-by" date, is too long, you can't find anything in it, etc etc etc.

I am choosing this thread to showcase (yeah, suitably OTT word!) a word new to me today.  PLUS I think that the French media must think they know something that perhaps the British media don't!

So here's in the French "news":  La reine a frôlé a la mort.

We could all say that someone of that age is perhaps frôlering with death!  OTOH, did anyone see la à télé the French gentleman of 105 who did some time trial in a velodrome and lifting weights in a gym!

What a fantastic oldie he is!

N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

Going back to "retrouvailles" - I remember that I first learned this word from Christophe's song Les Mots Bleus:
Je lui dirai les mots bleus
Les mots qu'on dit avec les yeux
Toutes les excuses que l'on donne
Sont comme les baisers que l'on vole
Il reste une rancœur subtile
Qui gâcherait l'instant fragile
De nos retrouvailles
De nos retrouvailles

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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

Had our own retrouvailles this afternoon, mais oui!

OH had taken our dog out for one of their regular walks.  I got home from a function and, within minutes, OH rang to say that he had lost the dog!

I jumped in our other car and went to where I knew they would be.  This is an area of dry marshes and we have walked there for years.  Only difference now is that the poor dog is near blind and almost completely deaf and  has dementia.  So no good however hard you holler or whistle, etc as she wouldn't hear you.

Combed the site, split up and did a search. On and on it went.  OH had met with 2 walkers before my arrival and told them what dog to look out for.

When there was little hope left that we'd find her and, as a last resort, we jumped in the car I'd arrive in to drive around the nearest village.  Normally, you'd be lucky to find anyone to ask anything of, especially on a Sunday afternoon but, this afternoon, we struck lucky!

Anyway, we passed this old house in the village and we saw 3 women outside.  I asked them if they'd seen our dog.  Immediately they said, "oui, on l'a trouvée!"  The joy, disbelief and awe were indescribable.  So then, I asked so where is she?  They said oh 2 persons, (one of whom was the owner of the house) have left in the car to look for your grey car, the grey car that is that OH had taken the dog out in.

Anyway, so as not to prolong the story and bore everybody, it turned out that 2 of the women were the very walkers that OH had met and they knew he had a grey car and that he was anglais.

The man had put our dog in his car and gone off in search of "une voiture grise avec un anglais".  To cut a long story short, tout va bien qui finit bien.  We had les grands retrouvailles and our dog has been restored to us.

To think that she is over 13 and would have been in sheer panic and that she had found this household of people très sympa who went in search of her owner and her car!  Not only that, she has had tremendous problems with her back legs and has trouble getting out of her bed and is now often doubly incontinent; it was nothing short of a miracle!

Just had to post that, prolonging the thread unnecessarily or not, off topic or not.  I am after all suffering from post traumatic stress and doggie is at last sleeping off her adventure though not before I had to bath her thoroughly from head to foot and she still smells of manure and the distance she would have covered on her poor old legs would have been in excess of 3 miles!  

N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

Mint, blow prolonging threads and being off topic - who cares, apart from pedants! I'm so happy all turned out so well, you must both have been in despair.


Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.


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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

For anyone following closely the recent French election, I hope you found lots and lots of new words and expressions to learn?

I followed the last election (that of Hollande's) closely too but this time, I know more French and everything is just that much more interesting.........and that wasn't exclusively down to Macron being an interesting man!  Mind you, his photo in our mairie, when it does arrive, will be a great deal more pleasing on the eye than poor old Hollande's.............oops, being shallow hereSmile [:)]

Back to the point of my post.  Can I ask whether perron can only be used for "impressive" steps like the ones outside the presidential palace or can you use the word for any old outside steps?  I don't have any steps leading up to my house so I won't be able to use my new mot du jour, but I'd still like to know if the steps have to be imposants before you call them le perron?

N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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Re: Clair, are you paying attention? Useful expressions!

For anyone following closely the recent French election, I hope you found lots and lots of new words and expressions to learn?

I followed the last election (that of Hollande's) closely too but this time, I know more French and everything is just that much more interesting.........and that wasn't exclusively down to Macron being an interesting man!  Mind you, his photo in our mairie, when it does arrive, will be a great deal more pleasing on the eye than poor old Hollande's.............oops, being shallow hereSmile [:)]

Back to the point of my post.  Can I ask whether perron can only be used for "impressive" steps like the ones outside the presidential palace or can you use the word for any old outside steps?  I don't have any steps leading up to my house so I won't be able to use my new mot du jour, but I'd still like to know if the steps have to be imposants before you call them le perron?

N'allez pas trop vite - Proust
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