French Education

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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

Flipin heck Wooly, it was just a colouring in of a face and they were asked to describe it with a couple of sentences. She is only 9. She preferred the colouring in.

The trouble also is that French children write English with that lovely French handwriting which is very difficult to read.

Last time I was at the channel tunnel I parked behind a big BMW SUV registered 24. I thought oh look some French family has been to the UK from the Dordogne. Then out popped the monster family. The blokes exposed tummy was hitting the ground. So was the tummy of his wife. The kids in the back were telling at each other. They were more Ant and Dec than Inspector Morse wolly
ner ner nee ner ner!!
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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zLjF9hlH2k
On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

H. L. Mencken 1880 - 1956

Some may not like his views, but what a prediction!
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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

 LOVELY FRENCH HANDWRITING?

You mean like my grandmother who was born in 1879 used to do and was hard to read. And why has France not got past those great educational reforms of the 80's........... NO! I DO NOT MEAN THE 1980'S BUT THE 1880'S.



And for some reason I had thought that your daughter was in college, but primaire and you may be OK ......... and the teacher may not exact revenge at a later date......... but just keep your eye out for it.


Best not to get me started on french education, I despair of it.



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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

I'm not quite a centenarian but I was taught NEVER to use the word "got" at all, ever, by my primary school teachers (in 1950s Forest Hill, south London - I doubt whether very many of them had much Latin).

It was only later that I came to understand that this is a very English prejudice against a useful word, and one that makes almost no sense at all to most writers in the United States.

It's highly likely that English teachers in France will have studied material from the US either instead of, or as well as, from England.

So to answer the OP's original question, in my view it was wrong to "correct" the French teacher's use of "got", as it isn't wrong.
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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

Buzzard wrote :
It's highly likely that English teachers in France will have studied material from the US either instead of, or as well as, from England.

Here, not far from Vannes, teachers of English appear definitely to be of the US/English rather than UK/English variety. I have discovered this in talking English with Lycée and IUT students.
Being in my late 60's I am quite firmly planted in the anti-got school as it was drilled into me in the many schools I went to how abominable this word was.
But, hereabouts, the students use it extensively - just as it is used in the US.

Sue
Computing - it's another world
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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

Well done the last two posters. We finally got there Lol. 😀

The teacher in question speaks perfect English with an American accent. We Brit Muppets think that kids in France should learn English English...!!!

My dad ( a cockney type who left school at 15) b###cked me whenever I I used the the word 'got'.
ner ner nee ner ner!!
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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

So just out of interest, do the "never use got" people extend the prohibition to the interrogative and negative forms?
Would you say, "have you got many children?" or "do you have many children?".
I think the answer to the latter could be, "never more than one a year". 🤔
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Re: Should I correct a French teacher who teaches English ?

I think my primary school teachers thought it was a word to be avoided, because "it was an ugly word".

Which is a funny objection, when you think about it. There's nothing wrong with "cot" or "lot", for example, and there are a large number of phrasal verbs like "get up", "get off", "get out", "get going" etc, which would find they were missing an important past tense.
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